The Advancing Trumpet Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Warmup Routine, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

When you first start using the book, in the first session (the Warmup Routine), just play exercises 1-4 and 17 the first week.  Then the second week add one more exercise (ie 1-5 and 17), then the third week add one more exercise (ie 1-6 and 17) and continue in this pattern until you are playing exercises 1-17 of the Warmup Routine daily.  If at any time the additional added exercise is not to your liking (still difficult) at the end of the practice week, then stay with that routine for another week or so until you it becomes easier for you.

#1 – The breath attack on the first note G of each set is to let your lips know that when you release the air stream you really want your lips to vibrate and instantly create your sound. Be sure to have your air pressure in place before starting the sound, the sound should start instantly. Exhale, inhale, release, resonate the room with your sound.

Match the tone color of the fingered notes to the open G sound. As you move your way down and up the scale, match the tone quality of each note to the others. Because you are using different valve combinations the tone quality will change, it’s up to you to make minor adjustments to get the tone quality to match note for note. Make sure to not slide the pitch from one to another, the pitch of each note should happen instantly. Keep the air moving through the valve changes. Always fill the room with your sound. Resonate the room.

Take the horn off your lips after each fermata. Rest as long as you just played. Note that each line of this exercise gets longer in length, learn to regulate your air flow, in and out.  After you’re done, rest at least two minutes, more is good.

#2 – Now we add the tongue attack (T) on the notes.  Get those first two eighth notes to resonate the room, they should not be staccato, just a full eighth note. By resonate the room, I don’t mean loud, rather get the feeling that you are filling the room with your sound to all the corners of the room and you can hear it coming back to you. This is not echo. It is you exciting the air in the room with your playing. Always, no matter what you are playing, resonate the room.

In measure two, three and four, connect the notes, do not slide between the notes. The note pitches are one or another, little notches of tone. Keep the air moving, think of everything as one long tone. Rest as marked.

#3 – Match the tone quality of each note, the fingered lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the fingered lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the fingered upper neighbor tone, the slur down, the fingered upper neighbor tone, and the slur down and hold. Keep the air moving, it’s all one long tone, just the pitches you play are different. Resonate the room.

#4 – Going from note 1 to note 2, it’s either the Db or the Bb, there is no Gb in the middle (same on the other valve combinations on the first two notes).  Then keep the air moving and slur down and up without sliding from note to note. Listen to yourself closely, each note has it’s pitch and tone quality, match them and smooth out any glitches.  All one long tone, resonate the room.

#5 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#6 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed.  When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#7 – It’s all one long tone, you are just changing pitches along the way. Match the tone quality pitch to pitch, especially the top note of the sets, keep the air moving all the way up and back down. No sliding, each note counts, each note resonates the room.

#8 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed.  When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#9/10 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#11 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed.  When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#12 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#13 – Wow, look at all of those Db notes. That 1-2-3 valve combination is the longest your trumpet gets, and it takes a little more concentration to get your horn to speak compared to other notes, and it’s up to you to make this happen. This study helps you learn how to match the tone quality going from longest to all the other valve combinations too, plus make it happen over a few different overtone partials. Be sure to do all of the articulations, this assures you are approaching this issue from every which way to get your chops working efficiently.  And remember, it’s all one long tone.  Oh, and… resonate the room.

#14/15 – Full length sixteenth notes, don’t try to play staccato, they are already short notes.  Resonate each one, every note counts, no fluffs accepted. Match the tone quality each note to the others, listen closely to the intonation of each note so you are playing the middle of the pitch when you attack the note. Keep reminding yourself that it’s all one long tone, the air keeps moving all the way from the first note through the last note. Get used to using that 3rd valve slide to get that Db in tune, it needs to be out for the Db and D, and for the 2-3 combinations (Eb and Ab) it’s in.  You can leave it out on anything other than 2-3, no airflow is going out the 3rd valve tubing if you don’t have the 3rd valve pushed down.

#16 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#17 – Go for a relaxed and resonate sound. Fill the room with your sound, not loud, just resonate.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

 

 

 

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