The Advancing Trombone Player – Owen Klug says this

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Owen Klug says this

Hi Mark,

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP. Thanks again, Owen Klug

Here’s a few comments that I have that may help others…

I had stopped playing for about 45+/- years. I gave everything away except the horn.

After retiring, I needed something to do and my horn was the answer. I played in several bands – from concert, swing, rock…etc. I was also in the ARMY Show Band.

I practiced and reached a level of proficiency that got me into 3 concert bands and 3 big swing/dance bands. then I seemed to plateau-out (did not get any better).

I think I heard about you and your method books through the internet… not sure.

The thing I’m finding the most effective about the Advancing Trombone Player book and system
is the exercises and the amount of exercises in each lesson. And the practice time required.

The thing I’m liking and impressed with the most is how quick I started improving again after leaving that initial plateau I was on.

The difference is your approach, I think.  The amount of exercises and the various types of challenging exercises you provide.  This differs from other lesson types. In addition, your lesson plans require more practice time and are more demanding. This is definitely a Good Thing.

The most obvious result I’ve noticed so far is my capabilities mature much faster and that helps and enhances my confidence level. I don’t feel so challenged when playing in bands.

I’m happy to tell you I’ve already recommended the Advancing Trombone Player to others, telling them how much my confidence level has increased since I started using the ATP.

One other thing, a little insight about Mark — he is very supportive and goes out of his way to help you improve and achieve your goals.

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP.

Thanks again, Owen Klug

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

Hi Owen, Mark here…

Thanks for sharing your comments and enthusiasm in your success using the Advancing Trombone Player method book system. I can tell you are putting in the disciplined practice time and follow the lesson plans, that’s the quickest way to get the most results in the least amount of time.  And as time goes by, as you progress through all of the lessons, things will continue you improve at an even quicker rate.

Congratulations, and thanks again for sharing your thoughts.

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

The Advancing Trombone Player

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player

Get your copy of this trombone study book today…

It’s a complete step-by-step system that includes everything you need to build your embouchure, tone, technique, flexibility, tonguing, endurance, range, and musicianship. Written for those trombone players who are ready to achieve the highest levels of playing their horn.

The “ATP” system consists of four sessions per day: warm-up, tonality study, Arban’s book studies, and endurance/range/musicianship studies. This will take approximately two hours per day divided into four sessions, with breaks in between. Don’t try to play all of the assignments in one session, you really do need the rest to keep your embouchure fresh all day and ready again for the next day.

If you cannot commit to two hours per day, then go with one hour per day and play every other exercise in the lessons on day one, then on day two play the ones you skipped, on day three alternate back to the ones you played on day one, and so on back and forth throughout the week. And spend two weeks on each lesson instead of one week, or longer if needed, when using this pattern.

The Advancing Trombone Player has additional emphasis on multiple tongue articulations in the tonality studies that builds more strength, endurance, and agility all over the horn. The ATP is really designed for those who really want to step up their game and master all registers of the trombone.

Get more info, sample pages, and order your copy of The Advancing Trombone Player now at:

http://www.MPHmusic.com/trombone

Best,

Mark

The Advancing Trombone Player – Tips #1

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Tips #1

I received this note from one of our customers, and I thought others may benefit from my answers too…

I have been making some progress through the lessons but my practice time has been somewhat restricted lately. I am concerned that I will spend one session warming up and then have little to no time for further lesson progression or just practicing music. Is there an expedited warm up regimen I can use. I have seen 20 minute plans and others.

Second what should I use as a metric or success before I move on through the parts of each lesson? No mistakes/perfect tempo, 1,2,3 mistakes? My concern with some of the Arban’s and even your practice lines is I might never play it perfectly. Or do you just play the lines once through ignoring mistakes and work to correct them the second time around?

Hope these questions make sense.
Any advice is appreciated.

Thanks, L.

And my note back to him…

Hi L.,

Try this for the warmup routine.

Do all of 1-5. This is basically a warmup. Get the lips vibrating, get the air moving, sound clearing, embouchure responding to tongue and slur, and some flexibility too.

Then for the other exercises (which are a daily routine to cover more areas of playing), do lines 1,3,5,7 one day, then line 1,2,4,6 the next. This assures you are covering all of each at least a few times during the week, and shortening the time.

As far as progressing through lessons week by week….

It is really at your own pace, and how picky and tough you want to be on yourself.

I’d rather have you play things slower, with a great sound on every note, and not necessarily the whole exercise meaning you can divide it up into doing a line at a time, etc – and piece it all together over time).

For the tonality studies (section 2), this works fine, because after the first 3 months you will be doing one tonality a day as improvement and review … and your sound, playing, and technique will be improving continuously.

For section 3 (Arbans) – same things, slower with great sound and accuracy is better than fast and bad. This approach yields the best results in the shortest period of time.

A lot of what we do when we practice is build the automatic response systems required to play, and we really must slow things down to do it – kind of like a kid learning to ride a bike – lots of wobbling and falling at first, but once the balance and memory response is developed, away they go.

And just as they learn to keep their balance, and pedal and ride faster, so will you in speeding up the exercises that need to be speeded up … but always, even at quicker speeds your sound must clearly resonate the room. Each and every note.

You can read more about how to use the book at this link: Advancing Trombone Player

To get the book and see more, click The Advancing Trombone Player book

Best,
Mark Hendricks

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The Advancing Trombone Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Tonality Studies, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

The most important rule – it’s better to play slow and correct, than fast and bad. If you practice playing incorrectly, you will only reinforce incorrect playing.

An interesting thought on these tonality studies – all of the commentary below applies to each of the tonalities, but what you will find is in each of the tonalities, each of the exercises will present different challenges due to range, fingerings, intonation, aperture, tongue levels, etc.

#1 – Believe or not, this is an interval study. Yes, the interval you on working on is the chromatic 1/2 step. Strive to have each and every note resonate clearly. Blow through the valves and out into the room. Get your tone to match on each note. Take your time, don’t rush. Think of this as a long tone study and move the air through the whole exercise. When tonguing, connect each note to the next, leave no space between the notes. Full value notes, not staccato. It’s all one long tone, your tongue is just articulating the beginning of each pitch.

#2 – Play with a full sound, not loud, just full. Once again this is all one long tone. Be sure you are not sliding between notes to get to the next note, it’s either one note or the other. Minimize the movement of your face and jaw as much as possible, use the beginning note as the homebase for your embouchure as you move through this exercise.

#3 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#4 – Practicing these slowly is good, focus on getting your slide to move quickly and smoothly at the correct time. You may wish to repeat each two bar phrase. Make sure to keep the air moving past the values and resonate the room with each note. Match the tone quality on each note.

#5, 6, 7 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#8 – When first learning the two octave chromatic scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave chromatic scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out.

#9 – Play with a full singing style sound. Make this study as musically beautiful as you possibly can. Resonate the room with a full and relaxed sound.

#10 – Each note needs to speak clearly. Don’t make them too short, each note should resonate. Be sure to play this one three times, and get it to sound great the first time through it.

#11 – Once again, think of this as one long tone, it’s one stream of air, but the pitch changes each beat. No separation between notes, no sliding between notes. Listen closely to your intonation, know ahead of time the pitch center of the note you are about to play, then play that note right in it’s most resonant center. Use all indicated articulations so you learn to come into the notes from every which way.

#12 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the double tongue articulation. It’s okay to slow down the double tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the T-K that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#13 – Each note should flow into the next one. You may want to also practice this all slurred so that you get the feeling of it all being one long tone, then go back and add the slur-two tongue-two articulation. Make this sound effortless.

#14/15 – Play full value sixteenth notes, don’t try to play them short, they’re already short. Connect each note to the next, with the tongue only activating to define the beginning of the notes. Use all indicated articulations.

#16/17 – Practice this slowly and memorize it. Get the feel for the free air flow up and down the arpeggio. Make it sound easy and effortless. Stay relaxed as you ascend and descend. Use all indicated articulations.

#18 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the triple tongue articulations. It’s okay to slow down the triple tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the TTK and TKT that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#19 – Playing these slowly is just fine. You are after accuracy and tone quality. You can learn these by playing two beats at a time ending on the next downbeat, then start on that note and do the same, two beats and end on the next downbeat. Then go back and put it all together. Use all indicated articulations.

#20 – Just as in the two octave chromatic study, when first learning the two octave whole tone scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave whole tone scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out. The whole tone scale will force you to hear the center of the next pitch so you can resonate the tone as soon as you play it.

#21 – Learn these augmented arpeggios one measure at a time, play a measure and end on the next downbeat. Start on the second measure and end on the next downbeat, and so on. Get the sound of these augmented chords in your head so you know where you are going with the pitch of each note so it resonates the room when you play each one. Once you have this, string the whole study together as one. Use all indicated articulations. Keep that air moving, it’s all one long tone. And resonate the room with every note.

#22 – Take your time, play it slowly. Rest between each section. Go for a full and beautiful singing sound, each note is clear and resonates the room. Match the tone quality of one note to the next, each note connects without break to the next. Use all indicated articulations.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trombone Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trombone

 

 

 

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The Advancing Trombone Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Warmup Routine, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

When you first start using the book, in the first session (the Warmup Routine), just play exercises 1-4 and 17 the first week. Then the second week add one more exercise (ie 1-5 and 17), then the third week add one more exercise (ie 1-6 and 17) and continue in this pattern until you are playing exercises 1-17 of the Warmup Routine daily. If at any time the additional added exercise is not to your liking (still difficult) at the end of the practice week, then stay with that routine for another week or so until you it becomes easier for you.

#1 – The breath attack on the first note F of each set is to let your lips know that when you release the air stream you really want your lips to vibrate and instantly create your sound. Be sure to have your air pressure in place before starting the sound, the sound should start instantly. Exhale, inhale, release, resonate the room with your sound.

Match the tone color of the fingered notes to the open F sound. As you move your way down and up the scale, match the tone quality of each note to the others. Because you are using different valve combinations the tone quality will change, it’s up to you to make minor adjustments to get the tone quality to match note for note. Make sure to not slide the pitch from one to another, the pitch of each note should happen instantly. Keep the air moving through the valve changes. Always fill the room with your sound. Resonate the room.

Take the horn off your lips after each fermata. Rest as long as you just played. Note that each line of this exercise gets longer in length, learn to regulate your air flow, in and out. After you’re done, rest at least two minutes, more is good.

#2 – Now we add the tongue attack (T) on the notes. Get those first two eighth notes to resonate the room, they should not be staccato, just a full eighth note. By resonate the room, I don’t mean loud, rather get the feeling that you are filling the room with your sound to all the corners of the room and you can hear it coming back to you. This is not echo. It is you exciting the air in the room with your playing. Always, no matter what you are playing, resonate the room.

In measure two, three and four, connect the notes, do not slide between the notes. The note pitches are one or another, little notches of tone. Keep the air moving, think of everything as one long tone. Rest as marked.

#3 – Match the tone quality of each note, the lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the upper neighbor tone, the slur down, the upper neighbor tone, and the slur down and hold. Keep the air moving, it’s all one long tone, just the pitches you play are different. Resonate the room.

#4 – Going from note 1 to note 2, it’s either the B or the G#, there is no E in the middle (same on the other slide combinations on the first two notes). Then keep the air moving and slur down and up without sliding from note to note. Listen to yourself closely, each note has it’s pitch and tone quality, match them and smooth out any glitches. All one long tone, resonate the room.

#5 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#6 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed. When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#7 – It’s all one long tone, you are just changing pitches along the way. Match the tone quality pitch to pitch, especially the top note of the sets, keep the air moving all the way up and back down. No sliding, each note counts, each note resonates the room.

#8 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed. When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#9/10 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#11 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed. When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#12 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#13 – Wow, look at all of those Cb notes. That 7th position is the longest your trombone gets, and it takes a little more concentration to get your horn to speak compared to other notes, and it’s up to you to make this happen. This study helps you learn how to match the tone quality going from longest to all the other slide positions too, plus make it happen over a few different overtone partials. Be sure to do all of the articulations, this assures you are approaching this issue from every which way to get your chops working efficiently. And remember, it’s all one long tone. Oh, and… resonate the room.

#14/15 – Full length sixteenth notes, don’t try to play staccato, they are already short notes. Resonate each one, every note counts, no fluffs accepted. Match the tone quality each note to the others, listen closely to the intonation of each note so you are playing the middle of the pitch when you attack the note. Keep reminding yourself that it’s all one long tone, the air keeps moving all the way from the first note through the last note.

#16 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#17 – Go for a relaxed and resonate sound. Fill the room with your sound, not loud, just resonate.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trombone Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trrombone

 

 

 

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The Advancing Trombone Player – Quick Start Guide

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Quick Start Guide

First of all…

Congratulations on your purchase of The Advancing Trombone Player book!

You’re embarking on a great journey complete with challenges and rewards… frustrations and fun too!

Here’s a few tips on getting starting using the ATP book:

1. Read the written materials in the front of the book during your rest time within your practice sessions, let the information there really sink in (read it many, many times).

2. When you first start using the ATP book, in the first session (the Warmup Routine), just play exercises 1-4 and 17 the first week. Then the second week add one more exercise (ie 1-5 and 17), then the third week add one more exercise (ie 1-6 and 17) and continue in this pattern until you are playing exercises 1-17 of the Warmup Routine daily. If at any time the additional added exercise is not to your liking (still difficult) at the end of the practice week, then stay with that routine for another week or so until you it becomes easier for you.

3. Always rest as much as you play DURING your practice sessions, not just between your practice sessions. You should still feel fresh at the end of the practice sessions, if not then rest more during the session. You don’t get better by playing incorrectly on beat up chops. Always strive to practice correctly. When you perform or rehearse with others, just play (your correct practice habits will be with you).

4. It’s really okay to play the tonality studies S-L-O-W-L-Y. Go for air flow (think of each exercise as one continuous long tone of air), resonant sound on every note (fill the room with your sound, no matter the length of the note), clean attack and articulations, etc. What you are wanting to do with slow practice is to give your body a chance to learn to coordinate all of the “moving parts” of trombone playing so that it becomes second nature (subconscious reflexes) and carries forward into the study when you incrementally speed it up to quicker tempo.

5. Practice all of the articulations notated (ie S, T, K, TK, TTK, TKT, Breath). This will get your embouchure learning to play each note in every which way and whatever direction.

6. When playing from the tonalities section, or the Arban’s studies section, or any other thing you practice… it’s okay to practice one measure at a time, or even two beats at a time, or whatever. You can always string things back together and play longer stretches of music as you get better. It’s more important to play correctly for short periods, than incorrectly for long periods of time.

7. In the fourth session of the lessons, play as musically as you can. Those short little songs in the Arban book are full of twists and turns that really can give your chops a good workout and get you playing with finesse, and if you do them as I prescribe, your chops will feel fresh at the end of that session. Follow the instructions in the fourth session on how to alternate in the full range studies a few days a week also.

8. Always strive to play with the best tone possible. That’s what people hear, so why not be aware of it all the time when you practice. If you really sound great, chances are you are playing correctly. Always be thinking to resonate the room, not just the horn. This is not loudness volume, this is resonance. You will hear the room “feed back” the sound to your ears when you get it right. This is not echo. It is more of a thickness of your sound in the air that resonates while you play.

9. Always strive to make your practicing sound musical – make music, that’s the ultimate end game, so do it all along the way too.

10. Consider taking some lessons, either locally with a good instructor, or with me via Skype (yes, it really does work well, and I am very, very good at coaching you along your ATP trail).

11. Contact some local ensembles and get going on playing with others (see this page for ideas).

12. Have fun and enjoy the ride!

You’ll find some other ATP tips here.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks