A Trumpet Summit – Live at Jazz in Marciac 1999

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Trumpet SummitA Trumpet Summit – Live at Jazz in Marciac 1999

Clark Terry – Benny Bailey

Jon Faddis – Nicholas Payton

Wynton Marsalis – Roy Hargrove

Terell Stafford – Stepka Gut

 

 

Track list:
1. Walking (M. Davis)
2. Sleepy Time Down South (M. Allison)
3. Home (P. Van Streden)
4. West End Blues (K. Alines)
5. Center Piece (S. H. Addison)
6. Jast A Close Walk With Thee
7. Body And Soul (J. Green – E. Heyman)
8. Stardust (H. Carmichael)
9. Moltenswing (B. Molten)

Clark Terry – trumpet
Benny Bailey – trumpet
Jon Faddis – trumpet
Nicholas Payton – trumpet
Wynton Marsalis – trumpet
Roy Hargrove – trumpet
Terell Stafford – trumpet
Stepka Gut – trumpet
Mulgrew Miller – piano
Pierre Boussaguet – bass
Alvin Queen – drums

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How To Spot A Trumpet Geek

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How To Spot A Trumpet Geek

Trumpet GeekCan you relate to this?

If yes, then I guess you are… A Trumpet Geek!

Check out the Trumpet Geeks International website who came up with this very descriptive cartoon at:

http://www.trumpetgeek.com/areyou.html

 

Don Jacoby Plays Trumpet Solo Favorites – Full Album

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Don JacobyDon Jacoby Plays Trumpet Solo Favorites – Full Album

This is the record album from 1959 featuring Don Jacoby on trumpet playing some of the most popular trumpet solos of the day.

Plus you’ll hear some great playing from members of the accompanying orchestra too.

Listen especially for the full, resonant sound that he had, remembering this is recorded with the audio techology available in 1959.

Here’s the video (and enjoy reading the liner notes below it)…

Notes from YouTube Show More section…

From the back jacket liner notes:

[“A searching study of the artistic possibilities of a fine musician and his horn, *Have Conns, Will Travel* silhouettes the many sides of Don Jacoby and a Conn trumpet against the perfectly balanced background of the Chicago Symphonic Band. A listening treat even to the untutored ear, the album consists of ten numbers in widely different styles, performed with striking brilliance and warmth of a man who obviously loves to play. Musicians will recognize this as a true *tour de force* by one of the most versatile trumpet artists in the world, as Jacoby’s big tone alternately spirals through solos, spearheads the brasses, or plaintively murmurs out a longing for some unknown.

Two of the numbers, ‘Soliloquy’ and ‘Jacob Jones,’ were composed and arranged by Jacoby and Hoyt Jones, a rising figure in composition and music education. Jones is also responsible for the ingenious arrangements of all the other numbers on side 2.

When asked why he included such diverse selections on one album, Don explained that he wanted to prove something to the thousands of students who have heard him in brass clinics. ‘I’ve been repeating what every instrumental teacher in the country knows – that no one can play good jazz until he’s learned to play legitimate music well,” Don said, “and I wanted this record to prove it.’

A man who has virtually let music leave his life, Don Jacoby has been traveling with trumpet since he was seven years old. As a youngster in York, Pa., Don made his professional debut when only nine years old, with the Spring Garden Band in York. His early training was of the traditional type – careful study of the classic disciplines of wind instruments.

For several years in his early teens, he made guest solo appearances with a number of bands in the East, as well as regular appearances on radio programs. For advanced studies he attended Ernest Williams School of Music in New York, to work under Dr. Williams, internationally famous cornet soloist, composer and teacher.

After graduation Don turned to the popular music field, to broaden his experience under such leaders as Van Alexander, Claude Thornhill and Les Brown. While in service bands during World War II, he worked with such musical giants as Vladimir Horowitz, Nathan Milstein, Fritz Kreisler and John Charles Thomas.

After leaving the service in 1945, he played with Les Brown and later Benny Goodman. In order to have more time with his family, he joined the studio orchestra of American Broadcast Company in Chicago. Since then, he has appeared on a number of programs as musical director as well as conductor and trumpet soloist, going to CBS in 1957.

First test of his forte as a brass clinician was at the annual Midwest Band Clinic in December, 1954. His clinic technique proved so popular that he finds himself ‘on the road’ once more – earnestly fulfilling the ever-increasing number of requests from schools, band festivals and musical conclaves throughout the nation. Though his clinic schedule take him far afield of his home, Don is nevertheless happy. ‘Music has been awfully good to me,’ he explains, ‘and Ihope that in my clinics I can do something for music in return for what it’s given me.’

Don’s virtuosity on the trumpet and cornet has also made him a favorite with leading composers of band music, several of whom have written trumpets works especially for Jacoby’s performance.

*Mr. Jacoby plays the 28A Connstellation cornett and the 38B Connstellation trumpet exclusively.*

———————-

Manufactured by RCA Custom Record Department for Musicade, Inc. Elkhart, Indiana

For the finest reproduction of this Ultra High Fidelity Recording use the RIAA curve position”]

If any viewers would care to forward more information about these sides and anything else about the sessions I will be happy to add it to this description, extending full credit if the contributor wishes it.

0:00 NAPOLI
3:54 ODE FOR TRUMPET
9:02 DRAMATIC ESSAY FOR TRUMPET
14:06 CARNIVAL VARIATIONS
16:03 JACOB JONES
18:50 GOODNIGHT MY SOMEONE & SEVENTY-SIX TROMBONES
22:46 TRUMPETER’S SOLILOQUY
26:20 MARCHETA
29:24 THE HOLY CITY

This original longplay soundtrack album was released as C-38B-1058 by Conn/Stellation Records circa 1959, and is part of my personal collection. I ripped its contents for my enjoyment and created this video hoping to share it with others who appreciate hard-to-find and obscure music. Should the current copyright holders require its removal from this site I will comply.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favour of fair use.

– – – –

Really great playing, don’t you agree?

Thanks for visiting our website, feel comfortable in looking around some more and visit often.

Signup for our updates, see top right of this page.

And LIKE and SHARE our Facebook page at: http://facebook.com/mphmusicdotcom

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Bill Adam and Greg Wing Do Schlossberg

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Bill AdamBill Adam and Greg Wing Do Schlossberg and Clarke

Listen closely to see how to practice Clark #1 and Schlossberg #6, 31, 13, 14, 15, 17 & 95 with his then student Greg Wing; 1980. Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

Greg has been the trumpet professor at Morehead State University for many years, see more about him and his career at Greg Wing.

Get the Schlossberg book at this link

Get the Clarke book at this link

Bill Adam and Greg Wing – on Soundcloud audio

 

Caduceus Pocket Cornet

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Caduceus Pocket CornetCaduceus Pocket Cornet

My friend Mark Ponzo, professor of trumpet at Northern Illinois University, posted a picture of this pocket cornet that created quite a buzz on Facebook.

He is getting one built by Robb Stewart for his own collection of hundreds of trumpets and cornets.

You can read all about it here:

http://www.robbstewart.com/OtherProjects/CruzPocket.html

And also see all of the other really neat things Robb has done starting at the home page of his site: http://www.robbstewart.com

And you can visit Mark Ponzo’s site (lots of great stuff there too) at: http://markponzo.com

AND… there’s lots of great stuff on this blog and more for trumpeters at http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Best,
Mark

 

 

 

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Transposition for Trumpet Players

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Concone Studies for TrumpetTransposition for Trumpet Players

Transposition for trumpet players is expected.

So if you haven’t already learned how to do this, get going.

If you have learned, it’s something that does get a little rusty unless you do it a little every day or so.

Here’s how to learn and master the skill of transposition for trumpet players…

Get this book:

Concone Studies: http://www.mphmusic.com/go/concone

Then work through it one by one…. first play as written, no transposition – just to get the tunes in your head – and assuming you are starting all of this on your Bb trumpet .

Then begin the transposing the studies for C trumpet…. A trumpet …  D trumpet… Eb…. F…. etc. (see transposition guide below).

This will work on transposition plus music phrasing, tone, air, etc.

It’s also good to get a church hymnal book (4 part harmony on two staves), and learn to transpose the top two parts (treble clef), and for a little more challenge learn to do it from the bass clef parts too 🙂 … if you ever play in church, knowing how to do this will really come in handy.

A more advanced book or two…

Bordogni: http://www.mphmusic.com/go/bordogni

Caffarelli: http://www.mphmusic.com/go/caffarelli

Start with the Concone Studies and church hymnal book.  🙂

Transposition Guide (you may already know this):

If you have a Bb Trumpet in your hands…

If the part is in Bb trumpet, then play it as written

If the part is in C trumpet, then play up 1 whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in A trumpet, then play down 1 half step (minor 2nd)

If the part is in D trumpet, then play up a major 3rd

If the part is in Eb trumpet, then play up a perfect 4th

If the part is in E trumpet, then play up a tritone

If the part is in F trumpet, then play up a perfect 5th

If the part is in G trumpet, then play up a major sixth

If the part is in Ab trumpet, then play down 1 whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in B trumpet, then play up 1 half step (minor 2nd)

If you have a C trumpet in your hands….

If the part is in Bb trumpet, then play it down a whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in C trumpet, then play it as written

If the part is in A trumpet, then play down a minor 3rd

If the part is in D trumpet, then play up a whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in Eb trumpet, then play up a minor 3rd

If the part is in E trumpet, then play up a major 3rd

If the part is in F trumpet, then play up a perfect 4th

If the part is in G trumpet, then play up a perfect 5th

If the part is in Ab trumpet, then play down major 3rd

If the part is in B trumpet, then play down 1 half step (minor 2nd)

One way to approach transposition is to know what note number of the scale you are looking at on the page. Such as in the key of C, the note F is the fourth note (4). So if you were playing a Bb trumpet and you see the page showing the key signature of C and it is a C trumpet part, you would play a G, which is the fourth note of a D scale. D is one whole step above the written key signature of C.

That’s why it’s really, really good to practice and know from memory all of your scales, arpeggios, etc. — the books on this page link will prove to be very valuable to you over the years (hint: get going now 🙂 ) –  See The Advancing Trumpet Player, The Comeback Trumpet Player, All The Notes and More!… at: http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark

Tromba Plastic Flugelhorn

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Tromba FlugelhornTromba Plastic Flugelhorn

It’s here, the Tromba Plastic Flugelhorn, and in comes in a variety of colors too.

 

 

Here’s a video…

Here’s where to get one… Tromba Plastic Flugelhorn

And you can see some videos and get more info on their Bb and C trumpets here:

http://mphmusic.com/blog/trumpet/tromba-plastic-trumpets-c-and-bb

 

 

 

 

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Rafael Mendez plays Arban single tonguing studies

Rafael MendezRafael Mendez plays Arban single tonguing studies

Arban’s single tonguing studies are among the most assigned, practiced, played, and reviewed by all trumpet players – beginner, intermediate, advanced, and pro alike.

In this video, one of the world’s most famous trumpeters plays the single tonguing studies 19-38 found on pages 28-36 in the Arban’s book.

You can also get some free samples of duets based on these and many more of the Arban tonguing studies in my popular book of “FORTY-NINE LONG LOST ARBAN DUETS FOR TRUMPET (…that Arban never wrote!)”, which is available at http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

They are also available for trombone and other bass clef instruments at http://www.mphmusic.com/trombone

Full Range Studies for Trumpet

Full Range Studies for TrumpetFull Range Studies for Trumpet

A complete system to develop and maintain your range, sound, endurance, and flexibility from Low F# to Double High C … and beyond! (91 pages)

The Full Range Studies for Trumpet book can be used by all trumpet players, at any level of playing. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, comeback player, or professional – this book will be very valuable to you over the years to come.

The “FRS” system consists of 18 studies. One study of the 18 should be played every other day on a rotation basis (1, 2, 3, 4…17, 18), and three times a week is recommended. You will do the complete rotation every 6 weeks. Don’t try to play all of the studies in one day, these are meant to build you up, not beat you up.

Each study session will take you approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. If you rest correctly during the practice session, your embouchure should feel good, not beat up. If you feel beat up then you didn’t rest enough or you went too far in the study. Only go as far in each study as you can without playing incorrectly. It does no good to practice incorrect habits.

Get more info and get your copy now here http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Full Range Studies for Trumpet – Quick Start Guide

Full Range Studies for TrumpetFull Range Studies for Trumpet – Quick Start Guide

Congratulations on your purchase of the Full Range Studies for Trumpet book!

Here’s a few tips on getting starting using the FRS book:

– The purpose of the book is to provide a complete system to develop and maintain your range, sound, endurance, and flexibility from Low F# to Double High C … and beyond! And it can be used by all trumpet players, at any level of playing. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, comeback player, or professional – this book will be very valuable to you over the years to come.

– The “FRS” system consists of 18 studies. One study of the 18 should be played every other day on a rotation basis (1, 2, 3, 4…17, 18), and three times a week is recommended. You will do the complete rotation every 6 weeks. Don’t try to play all of the studies in one day, these are meant to build you up, not beat you up.

– Each study session will take you approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. If you rest correctly during the practice session, your embouchure should feel good, not beat up. If you feel beat up then you didn’t rest enough or you went too far in the study. Only go as far in each study as you can without playing incorrectly. It does no good to practice incorrect habits.

– Be diligent in your practice, you will be rewarded for your discipline by following the routines in the 18 studies – using these studies in this step-by-step system will get you playing better, and much quicker, than a haphazard approach to practicing

– Rest as much as you play and rest as much as you play within each practice session, you should still feel good at the end of each practice session

– Always strive for a great sound on every note

– Always play musically – don’t just play, make music

– Slow and good is better than fast and bad – you will learn faster by practicing slowly, then speed up in small increments to improve your coordination to play faster and still sound good

– Practice all of the articulations when indicated (S=Slur, T=Tongue, B=breath, etc.)

– Use a metronome to help you improve your coordination as you speed things up

– If you can’t reach some notes, give it three tries and then move on – they will come in time

– Play with other people, whether it be duets, trios, quartets, quintets, band, orchestra, jazz ensemble, church services – get out there and rehearse, perform and make music with others

– Each study is meant to be played once and then move to the next one on the next FRS practice day of the week (every other day, three days a week is fine). These are not technically hard, so you don’t have to “practice” them with repetition, so just move on to the next study in rotation. Just keep progressing step-by-step through the lessons – and start with Study 1

– When you get to the end of the 18 studies after 6 weeks, start at Study 1 again and continue through the studies to Study 18. Then once again go back to Study 1 and do the same, again and again for development and maintenance

– As you advance in these studies, you can begin playing two phrases together without removing the mouthpiece and resting. Do the whole book this way (1-18 in rotation), then on the next time through the book do 3 phrases without removing the mouthpiece, and the next time through the book 4 times, etc. – always end your practice session feeling good so you can practice other things or perform later

For more info on the book and other trumpet books you may be interested in, visit:

http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Hey Trumpet Players – here’s a great freebie for you!

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FreeHey Trumpet Players – here’s a great freebie for you!

(updated as of 12/21/15 – download again for the newest version)

It’s the Trumpet Players Sample Pack.

These are sample studies and exercises from our books for trumpet you can add to your practice routines. And if you like them, we’re guessing you’ll want to purchase the complete print books too.

Here’s how to get the Trumpet Players Sample Pack, click this link and see the top of the page:

http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

Oh, one other thing…Be sure to check out out blog for lots of videos, event
updates and more at:http://www.mphmusic.com/blog
And also LIKE our Facebook page at:http://www.facebook.com/mphmusicdotcom

You can share this message with your friends,
I know they will appreciate you thinking of them.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Give It The 3rd Finger for Trumpet – 101 Studies plus 12 Etudes and 12 Matching Duets

Give It The 3rd Finger for Trumpet - 101 Studies, plus Etudes and Duets

Give It The 3rd Finger for Trumpet – 101 Studies plus 12 Etudes and 12 Matching Duets

101 Trumpet Studies For Making Your 3rd Finger Work Right, And Your Tongue And Chops Too, Plus 12 Etudes and 12 Matching Duets That Target Your 3rd Finger (69 pages) – by Mark Hendricks

These studies, etudes and duets are all about developing your 3rd finger.

You know what I’m talking about, it’s the one that really hangs you up when you’re playing scales and arpeggios, and completely messes you up when you’re really trying to impress your friends and amaze your audiences…. 🙂 –

You can download a free sample page from the book, see below.

All of the studies, etudes, and duets in this book target your 3rd finger while playing a variety of interesting patterns, articulations, and ranges. Developing your 3rd finger strength, technique, and coordination will improve all of your abilities to play with more agility, musicality, and confidence.

Get a free sample PDF of the first pages of the sixteenth notes and triplets exercises plus two of the etudes/duets. There are 101 3rd finger studies, and 12 etudes and 12 matching duets in the full printed book (69 pages).

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

One very important tip for The Comeback Trumpet Player

The Comeback Trumpet PlayerOne very important tip for The Comeback Trumpet Player

Immediately go find some groups to play in and make music. This will keep you motivated to practice and you need to make music, not just practice to really get yourself back into shape and enjoying all aspects of playing the trumpet (music, social, challenge, concentration, etc).

Here’s a few ideas:

1 – Community Bands and Orchestras

2 – Brass Bands

3 – Church groups

4 – Jazz Ensembles

5 – College-sponsored groups

6 – Duets with other trumpet players (5 star tip)

Actually schedule a time each week to play duets. We all need to have ensembles to play and perform in, and a duet is the easiest to organize – it’s just you and your duet partner. Or add a third player to make things even more fun (plus this makes sure you are resting properly by having only two of you play while the third is resting).

Here’s a page on my site for some links to lots of performing options:

http://mphmusic.com/play/

And…

Get that book “The Comeback Trumpet Player”

And if you need a great duet book, look on my site for the 49 Long Lost Arban Duets for Trumpet (…that Arban never wrote!)

Here’s a sample letter you can email to the organizations you find in the directory:

replace “wind ensemble” with orchestra, brass band, church orchestra, etc

Subject line: I am interested in playing trumpet in your wind ensemble.

Message:

Hi,

My name is Mark Hendricks.

I am interested in playing trumpet in your wind ensemble.

Here is where you can see a little about my experience:

http://mphmusic.com/about.htm

(or just include a little about your experience here, if you don’t have a webpage)

Whether it be an extra chair upon occasion, or to fill a current opening, it’s okay with me.

Mark Hendricks
Phone: 987 654 3210  (use your real phone number 🙂 )

That’s it. They will get back to you.

Go forth and let the trumpet sound!!

Mark

 

Sandstone and Marble for Trumpet – by Adam Levowitz

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Sandstone And MarbleSandstone and Marble for Trumpet – by Adam Levowitz

I recently had the pleasure of attending a concert featuring Dr. Chuck Seipp, trumpet soloist and professor of trumpet at the Shenandoah Conservatory.

Chuck was accompanied by the Fanfare Concert Winds concert band in Tampa, Florida and performed a terrific work for trumpet and band called “Sandstone and Marble” by composer Adam Levowitz.

You can listen to a recorded performance (not the live concert I heard) and also see the full score that includes the solo trumpet part at the top at this link:

http://www.windmusicsales.com/score/Levowitz/SandstoneandMarbleFantasiaforTrumpetandBand/CB10188-

I really enjoyed it, and I think you will too.

You can also read more about Chuck Seipp and Adam Levowitz at their websites:

http://www.cjseippmusic.com

http://www.adamlevowitz.com

As always, my best to you —

Mark

Ruben Simeo – this young man REALLY plays the trumpet

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Ruben SimeoRuben Simeo – this young man REALLY plays the trumpet

Here’s two of his videos, just amazing playing…

(you can see more of him at his youtube channel)

And check out all of the trumpet study books that can help you too – All The Notes and More… The Advancing Trumpet Player… The Comeback Trumpet Player… Give It The 3rd Finger… Daily Stuff… 49 Long-Lost Arban Duets for Trumpet at http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm – you can get some free samples of them all.

Enjoy! — Mark

The Advancing Trumpet Player

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The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player

Get your copy of this trumpet study book today…

It’s a complete step-by-step system that includes everything you need to build your embouchure, tone, technique, flexibility, tonguing, endurance, range, and musicianship. Written for those trumpet players who are ready to achieve the highest levels of playing their horn.

The “ATP” system consists of four sessions per day: warm-up, tonality study, Arban’s book studies, and endurance/range/musicianship studies. This will take approximately two hours per day divided into four sessions, with breaks in between. Don’t try to play all of the assignments in one session, you really do need the rest to keep your embouchure fresh all day and ready again for the next day.

If you cannot commit to two hours per day, then go with one hour per day and play every other exercise in the lessons on day one, then on day two play the ones you skipped, on day three alternate back to the ones you played on day one, and so on back and forth throughout the week. And spend two weeks on each lesson instead of one week, or longer if needed, when using this pattern.

The Advancing Trumpet Player has additional emphasis on multiple tongue articulations in the tonality studies that builds more strength, endurance, and agility all over the horn, and has six more full range studies than The Comeback Trumpet Player book. The ATP is really designed for those who really want to step up their game and master all registers of the trumpet.

Get more info and order your copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player now at:

http://www.MPHmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm

Best,

Mark

Rich Willey “Gives It The 3rd Finger” Treatment

Rich Willey “Gives It The 3rd Finger” Treatment

Give It The 3rd Finger for Trumpet - 101 Studies, plus Etudes and DuetsYou’ve probably heard of Rich Willey, recently he purchased my “Give It The 3rd Finger” book for trumpet with all of the 3rd finger studies, etudes, and duets.

The day after he received it via UPS, he wrote these comments to me…

Mark! I did the first 14 drills tonight at eighth note = 72, and then I practiced the changes from “Have You Met Miss Jones” (that’s the recording I’m sharing with you) and I was amazed at the amount of progress I made just in that one practice session. Usually I miss all the G#s (Abs) and low Ds and low Ebs, and in fact, if you listen to this (I played a chorus/rested a chorus), I even went into my dreaded lower register to see if my fingers would work on those low notes, and very many of them came popping right out! You’re a genius!!! Thanks, man. I could’ve used better 3rd valve technique this past weekend on gigs, but I’ll forgive you just this once. 😉 Thanks for turning out such an incredible regimen designed for people like me with nearly useless third fingers on trumpet! Seriously, man, thank you!!!

— Rich Willey

And a day later, he wrote again…

Please bear in mind that this is how I *practice* … I play a chorus and rest a chorus, and try to do that (and record the whole thing in ProTools) on a couple of tunes daily. I almost always go back and play the other horn in the “holes” left skipping choruses on the first take. These are by no means intended to be released to the public, but I guess just this once I’ll make an exception 🙂

I really want to coerce my fingers into cooperating with me, so I figured I would start very slowly and hopefully (per your instructions) get them clean and eventually speed up the process. This is the first regimen designed for whipping the 3rd finger into shape that I’ve seen that doesn’t bore the crap out of me. Also, turns out I did the first 15 last night, and then did 16-30 tonight before going on to 44 after that, just to get an overdose of this new treatment. I can see that it will take a lot of hard work on my part, but having a plan laid out is the best thing that has ever come along for my stubborn third finger.

So, thank you, Mark! I now have hope of being able to not scuffle as much in “those keys” that have those fingerings that I have been afraid of for years!

You da man!

Rich Willey

Mark here again… (thanks Rich)…

Down a couple of paragraphs is a link to a few choruses of “Have You Met Miss Jones” that Rich sent to me. Like he said, he recorded the trumpet choruses in one practice session, then the bass trumpet choruses the next day (by the way, a great way to practice, play a chorus, rest a chorus… “rest as much as you play”). His recording was about 23 minutes long, so I’ve just copied a few of the choruses to give you an example of how he practices jazz improvisation. By the way, Rich writes some great books for trumpet and other instruments, and also writes great arrangements too… check out his website at http://www.Boptism.com

Click this next link below and then go down the page to the “Give It The 3rd Finger” section and you will see the audio play button, click it and listen in on Rich’s practice session…

Go to the audio here… http://www.MPHmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm

While you’re there, pick up a copy for yourself, or a friend, or all of your students.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Lester Bowie playing Hello Dolly

Lester Bowie playing Hello Dolly

One of the most, if not THE most, expressive renditions of HELLO DOLLY you will ever hear…

While you’re here, check out all the trumpet books and freebies at:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm

Clifford Brown – The Complete Studio Recordings

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Clifford Brown – The Complete Studio Recordings

Outstanding is putting it mildly.

Here’s a great collection of Clifford Brown transcribed solos – click here

Freddie Hubbard – Two Great Ballad Solos

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Freddie Hubbard – Two Great Ballad Solos

Here’s two great solos by Freddie Hubbard, enjoy!

Here’s That Rainy Day

Misty

And here’s one more, a favorite of mine…

The Things We Did Last Summer

Now that’s some kind of ballad playing.

🙂 Mark Hendricks

Harmon Mute Cork Template for Trumpet

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Harmon Mute Cork TemplateHarmon Mute Cork Template for Trumpet

So you need to replace the cork on your Harmon mute?

Here’s a template created provided by Minnesota State College Southeast Technical.

Instructions:

Click this link to download the PDF template:

http://www.mphmusic.com/images/harmonwowwowmutecorktemplate.pdf

Print out the template

Get a sheet of thin cork at least 6 inches wide and 3 inches high (auto parts store or hobby shop may have it), try to match the thickness of the original cork on the mute

Cut out the shape of the cork from the template

Place it on the cork sheet and draw around the edge

Cut off the excess cork

Scrape off the old cork from mute, clean and dry well

Use contact glue or Gorilla glue on mute and cork

Place the cut cork on the mute, pressing until a good bond is realized

Let dry.

Be happy you didn’t have to shell out big bucks for a new Harmon mute 🙂

Want to know how to make a homemade Whispa mute? Check near the bottom of this webpage:

http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

10th Grader says this is his quick warm-up

Give It The 3rd Finger10th Grader says this is his quick warm-up

I just got a note from trumpet pro and long-time trumpet teacher John Baker (Tampa area) that one of his students who has been working his way through all of the “Give It The 3rd Finger” studies book uses three specific exercises as a quick warm-up when he doesn’t have time for a more thorough one.

It’s exercises 1, 3, and 30 — memorize them and play all the articulations indicated says John’s 10th grade student.

So I gave it a try and thought about all the quick benefits to doing this that he discovered: finger technique, air flow and speed, tone, flexibility, articulation, slurring, single tongue, K tongue, double and two forms of triple tonguing, and giving your brain a little workout for keeping you sharp and thinking well.

If you have the book or the free sample pack you can try out his discovery for yourself.

If you don’t have the book or free sample pack you can get yours here:

http://www.MPHmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm

And be sure to visit our blog that is at our website, it’s direct address is:

http://www.MPHmusic.com/blog

I guess I could have titled this…

“Young Dog Teaches Old Dog New Tricks”
(…even if the Old Dog wrote the book)

🙂

In joy!

Mark Hendricks
http://www.MPHmusic.com

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Tromba Plastic Trumpets – C and Bb

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Tromba C TrumpetTromba Plastic Trumpets – C and Bb

(yes, you can use your own mouthpiece instead of the ones they provide)

Priced under $200!

(…and I hear they have a flugelhorn coming soon too! – here it is… Flugelhorn)

Here’s links to see all the colors they are available in:

Tromba C Trumpets
http://mphmusic.com/go/tromba-c-trumpet

Tromba Bb Trumpets
http://mphmusic.com/go/tromba-Bb-trumpet

Here’s some videos with some great players playing them:

Tromba B flat & C Trumpet Update!
Informal video of unboxing and demo of updated Tromba B flat and C Ultralight Series Trumpets by Jon Dante, Principal Trumpet of the Singapore Symphony Orchestra.

Tromba Ultralight C Trumpet Comparison Demo
Jon Dante compares the new Tromba Ultralight C Trumpet with other professional models he owns. Recorded on iPhone 6 camera with no sound editing or processing.

James Wilt Demonstrates the Tromba Ultralight Trumpets
James Wilt, Associate Principal Trumpet of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, demonstrates both the Tromba Ultralight C and B flat trumpets

And a little more Tromba Trumpet Info – Dan Stine

Charlier 36 Etudes Contest – Great Idea

Charlier 36 EtudesCharlier 36 Etudes Contest – Great Idea!

The “36 Etudes Transcedentes” is a classic book of 36 difficult etudes by the Belgian trumpet teacher Theo Charlier. Most trumpet students work out of this book in music school, but usually they don’t get past the first dozen of them. The etudes get quite difficult as they go on and almost everyone gives up eventually and goes back to practicing Pictures at an Exhibition and the Haydn Trumpet Concerto instead.

In 2012-2013 five trumpeters from around the world resolved to work through the book with the added incentive of a friendly competition. The Charlier Challenge was born. There were five: Justin Bartels (Principal Trumpet of the Colorado Symphony), Carrie Schafer (Second Trumpet in the Saint Louis Symphony), Mike Martin (Fourth Trumpet with the Boston Symphony), Liam Day (Sub-principal Trumpet with the Malaysian Philharmonic), and Joshua MacCluer (Principal Trumpet of the Hong Kong Philharmonic). The competition truly was a world class affair.

The format of the Charlier Challenge was as follows: every week they learned the next etude in the book and recorded their best single take effort with no editing allowed. They submitted every Wednesday. The clips were put up anonymously online and 36 first class guest judges each judged a week and picked their favorite, submitting comments if they so desired. Each week one point was awarded and the winner would be the one with the most points at the end of the 36 weeks. The celebrity guest judge list was a long list of great trumpeters and other well known artists.

You can read more and listen to the winning recordings at this link:

http://joshuamaccluer.com/the-charlier-challenge

Give It The 3rd Finger for Trumpet - 101 Studies, plus Etudes and DuetsAnd if you have a studio full of trumpet students, we can do something similar to this with my “Give It The 3rd Finger” book, read more about how this is done at this link:

http://mphmusic.com/blog/trumpet/give-it-the-3rd-finger-contest-winner/

What a great idea!!

Mark Hendricks

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Tom Hooten playing Pictures at an Exhibition

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Thomas HootenTom Hooten playing Pictures at an Exhibition

Tom is the Principal Trumpet player with the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

This is a link to the recording of a live concert May 3, 2015.

Click the link…  then click the play button for May 3 concert… Pictures starts about half way…  it’s only available this week…

http://www.kusc.org/socalsundaynight/lapo/index.aspx

Enjoy!

Mark

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