The Advancing Trumpet Player – Jeff Brandt says

May 31, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

Mark,

The books you have recently written, are ALL just fantastic! ”

“Give It The 3rd Finger” has certainly turned out to be a hit with people as I watch posts about it.

But, I have to tell you, “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book, has been extremely helpful to me!

The combination of all the things you put in there, from all the years from many different teachers, brought back to memory all those things, and IF, IF I would just do them daily as you state, I really begin to improve quickly, and gain back many of the strengths I once had, and I improve with much less stress. Your book WORKS wonders! It is a true must for trumpet players who want to improve or maintain. It’s great Mark.

Thanks for putting so much time, thought and effort into such a excellent resource for all of us ! You are a blessing, in many, many ways!

Sincerely,

Jeff Brandt
Director of Music Ministries and Solo Trumpeter
New Hope United Methodist Church
Valrico, Florida

Jeff, thanks so much for your kind words, and it makes me feel great that “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book has helped you so much.

For those trumpeters who want to chack out why Jeff was so excited to write, here’s a link to all the trumpet books….

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

And if you play trombone or sax, here’s a link for you too…

http://mphmusic.com

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Here’s what Jeff Brandt had to say

May 30, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Mark,

The books you have recently written, are ALL just fantastic! ”

“Give It The 3rd Finger” has certainly turned out to be a hit with people as I watch posts about it.

But, I have to tell you, “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book, has been extremely helpful to me!

The combination of all the things you put in there, from all the years from many different teachers, brought back to memory all those things, and IF, IF I would just do them daily as you state, I really begin to improve quickly, and gain back many of the strengths I once had, and I improve with much less stress. Your book WORKS wonders! It is a true must for trumpet players who want to improve or maintain. It’s great Mark.

Thanks for putting so much time, thought and effort into such a excellent resource for all of us ! You are a blessing, in many, many ways!

Sincerely,

Jeff Brandt
Director of Music Ministries and Solo Trumpeter
New Hope United Methodist Church
Valrico, Florida

Jeff, thanks so much for your kind words, and it makes me feel great that “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book has helped you so much.

For those trumpeters who want to chack out why Jeff was so excited to write, here’s a link to all the trumpet books….

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

And if you play trombone or sax, here’s a link for you too…

http://mphmusic.com

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

.

Allen Vizzutti in Concert and Clinic

December 27, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

It’s no April Fools Day joke.

Allen Vizzutti in Concert

Allen Vizzutti in Concert and Clinic
Laura Vizzutti – Piano
Saturday, April 1, 2017
8:00 PM
University of Central Florida
Orlando, Florida

Free Piano Clinic with Laura Vizzutti
2:00 – 3:00 PM
Free Trumpet Clinic with Allen Vizzutti
3:00 – 4:00 PM

Concert at… Saturday, April 1, 2017 – 8:00 PM

 

TICKETS
$15.00
$10.00 with Student ID
Free with UCF ID

Questions/Answers:

Email John Almeida at: hbbja1@icloud.com

Get great trumpet, trombone, and saxophone study and etude
books, take a look at:

Trumpet – http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Trombone – http://mphmusic.com/trombone

Saxophone – http://mphmusic.com/saxophone

 

 

.

Amazing Progress By Young Trumpet Players

July 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

John BakerAmazing Progress By Young Trumpet Players

Mark,

Just wanted to give you some news on the progress of a couple of my students who I have using your books.

My student Travis who has two of your books will be a Senior in high school. He has decided that he wants to study Business Music and trumpet . Looks like he will be going to Shenandoah Conservatory of Music in Virginia with Chuck Seipp as his trumpet professor. He found out the cost is $30,000 per year (whew). He also found out that he is elegible for their President’s scholarship at $20,000 per year. They require a 3.7 un-weighted grade point. He has a 3.9. They also require 1200 SAT, he has a 1350. The music department also has money, so both combined will cover his cost for all 4 years. Travis, with hard work from your books, is playing a consistent high F, and a G 40% of the time. His scales are just stunning. And his all-state material is coming along really well.

Another student Jack, a 9th grader going to be a 10th grader when school begins, is playing  a consistent G and A. He is hitting a Double Bb about 15% of the time. And powerful. With time he will get it and above. Your material has also helped him. He finished the year at Plant Hi being 1st chair in concert band, 1st in trumpet quintet, and lead trumpet in Jazz Band. He got a Superior rating performing a grade 6 solo at district and state solo and ensemble. His most current success was to get the lead trumpet spot in USF’s summer Jazz band camp.  Your scale book (All The Notes and More) and 3rd finger book (Give It The 3rd Finger) has him playing miles above other students his age, and thus his reading, jazz and concert is superior. He decided last week that he wants to give auditioning for the All-Star Grammy Band a try.

With the aid of your books I have 2 very motivated young men on my hands. Thanks for what you have done.

And another update, the Trumpet Festival we do in Tampa is set for for October 10th. Our featured guest artists are Chuck Seipp and the sensational young player Geoff Gallente. I know both Chuck and Geoff use your books too. Chuck and Geoff are booked to do the workshops and perform on the concert that night.

John Baker
Tampa, Florida

Hi John,

Thanks for the update.

It’s great to hear the progress your students are making using the books I’ve written.

If people will actually have the discipline, by themselves as self-study or with a good teacher like yourself, they will get results.

For those who have the books, just follow those lesson plans and follow the instructions closely in the written materials in the books and the guides I’ve posted on the blog for each book.

To see all the trumpet books, see http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

To see all the trombone books, see http://mphmusic.com/trombone

To see all the sax books, see http://mphmusic.com/saxophone

And check the Categories column on this page to see more info on each book.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

 

The Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #3

July 12, 2016 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #3

Increasing endurance with little time to practice, airflow and buzzing, mouthpiece placement

One of The Advancing Trumpet Player book owners wrote to me and said…

Any advice for the comeback player using The Advancing Trumpet Player book, with people who have some time issues. Been playing 8 (come back after 25 off) years and still some of the warm ups I do totally wear me down. All of this info on air and buzzing, I’m not sure even how to set my mpc any more.

Thanks,
Mark S.

Hi Mark,

Thanks for your question.

When I was doing my comeback after 20 years of not playing, I also was frustrated with my endurance.  I remembered how I used to be able to play and play. But what I didn’t remember is the years of building up to that happened as I developed my trumpet playing. Even so, it was frustrating.

So how did I solve this?

I pulled out my Arban’s book, when to those old songs and started playing four measures at a time (usually one phrase). Then I would take the horn off my face and sing what I play and finger the notes. Then I would play the next four measures and then rest while I sang those. And continued this pattern to the end of the song. Then I would rest as much time as it took to sing through the entire song.

Then I continued this and did two pages of those songs. The next day I would start with the second page of the prior day for a little repetition of material and my second page on day two would be new.  And on and on in this pattern to the end of those old songs section.

Then I went back the first song and did eight measures, rest and sing eight, play eight, rest and sing eight, etc – and did two pages like that. Then next day, start with the second page and add the next page, etc.

Voila – I was resting as much as I was playing.

The problem is…. we hear people say “Rest as much as you play”, and we play and play for an hour, beat up our chops, then rest an hour, comeback to practice on beat up chops and wonder why things don’t work and we don’t improve.

Mark says… Rest as much as you play DURING each practice session, you should feel fresh and good at the end of your practice sessions. If you don’t, your not practicing correctly.  It does no good to practice on tired chops, you will only be developing bad habits, not good ones.

I included this “How To Increase Your Endurance The Easy Way” Special Report PDF in the Trumpet Players Sample Pack available for free at http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Now as far as air and buzzing…

Let’s focus instead on sound, your sound.  It’s what people hear.  The don’t hear your air, they don’t hear your buzzing.

Focus on resonating the room with your sound.  This is not echo.  This is a thickness of sound that surrounds you when you play as you fill the room with your sound, you literally vibrate the room with your tone.  And you don’t have to play loud to do this. It’s more of opening yourself up so your airstream is easily moving through your horn and filling the room with sound on each and every note.

How do you practice this?

Those first few warmup exercises get you going on this in the Advancing Trumpet Player book, take your time, just get into the feeling of filling the room with your sound, resonate the room. I repeat myself, but that’s what I think about… listening for the room to resonate and tell me that I am playing correctly with a full and relaxed sound on each and every note, no matter if it’s short or long, low or high, soft or loud – resonate the room with the sound concept you are wanting to have.

Once you get the feeling of this it will carry over into all of your playing, if you pay attention to it. And you must on each and every note… resonate the room.

Okay enough of resonate the room 🙂

Mouthpiece placement…

Play a second line G with a full resonant sound with a comfortable mouthpiece placement, not too far left or right, not too far up or down… just make it feel good and sound good.  Let that be home base for a while. Build everything from that second line G.  Later on you may want to use top of the staff G for your setup, but that’s for later.  Get your in the staff sound resonating first.

Some more thoughts and things to do for mouthpiece placement…

A little more for mouthpiece placement….

Get a 8×10 mirror and put it on your music stand so you can see yourself

Start with directly centered under your nose and in half and half upper and lower lips left/right in the middle, even if feels lousy at first

Then just play 2nd line G, half note, half note, whole note – horn off lips and rest that much

Reset and do the same 10 times – Mezzo Forte – but resonate the room

Just try that setup and see where it gets you.  Try it for at least 5 days like this — practice other stuff too after doing this and don’t think about placement so much, it will carry over. After the 5 days, you will probably used to it.

You may then experiment with tiny adjustments up down left right to find the spot where your chops resonate the room the best – let the sound be your guide not so much the feeling of the chops — your chops will build the embouchure to support the sound you discover that resonates the room when you play.

Slow and steady and a little of this every day, and let it carry over to your other playing.

Once this 2nd line G starts resonating for you they way you like, then do the first Full Range Study that is in The Comeback Trumpet Player book, The Advancing Trumpet Player book, and the Full Range Studies for Trumpet book. Be sure to play each valve combination slowly, take the horn off your face between each one and rest as much as you just played.  Make sure you don’t slide note to note, make your chops work and resonate well on each note. Only go as high as it is easy, with the mouthpiece placement you are not trying to build range with this exercise, but rather just get things working well in the staff. You don’t need to go higher than top of staff G for this.  And your chops should feel good after doing this, if they don’t you didn’t rest enough or you went to high.

If you don’t have these books, get the free Trumpet Players Sample Pack – this first exercise is in the Full Range Studies sample PDF, just do that first page and extend the pattern up to top of staff G. Get the sample pack at http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Remember to resonate the room as your guide to whether you are playing correctly.

Listen to the sound of the room, more than the sound of your trumpet.

Hope that helps!

Mark

To get a copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player, click here

To get more Advancing Trumpet Player tips and info, click here

The Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #2

July 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #2

How To Improve the K in Double Tonguing

One of The Advancing Trumpet Player book owners wrote to me and said…

Hello Mark,

I am working in the ATP book and trying to work on K tongue and TK. It is horrible! The slow tempo sounds so bad that I do not see how it can progress. Is this what I should expect until the K sounds like T?

Thanks for any help,

Tony

Hi Tony,

The idea and goal is to get the T and the K to sound alike.

Okay, so how do you do that?

Here’s a few things to do…

Days 1-2:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play two half notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room, do this four times
– Now play two half notes and a whole note with the same airflow and start the half notes and whole note with the K attack, more like Kuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the K (kuh) articulation

Days 3-4:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play four quarter notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play four quarter notes and a whole note with the same airflow and start the quarter notes and whole note with the K attack, more like Kuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the K (kuh) articulation

Days 5-6:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play eight eighth notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play eight eighth notes and a whole note with the same airflow and start the eighth notes and whole note with the K attack, more like Kuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the K (kuh) articulation

Days 7-8:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play four quarter notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play four quarter notes and a whole note with the same airflow and use the alternating Tuh-Kuh-Tuh-Kuh-Tuh… for the quarter notes and whole note – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the T-K-T-K-T (tuh-kuh) articulation

Days 9-10:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play eight eighth notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play eight eighth notes and a whole note with the same airflow and use the alternating Tuh-Kuh-Tuh-Kuh-Tuh… for the eighth notes and a whole note – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the T-K-T-K-T (tuh-kuh) articulation

Here’s what you’re training yourself to do…

– keep the air moving
– articulating the airflow with double tongueing articulations
– keeping the resonance of tone to fill the room with your sound
– keeping your mind focused on resonating each tone you play

You may also want to practice this with a softer attack of Duh-Guh-Duh-Guh-Duh.

Always keep the airflow and resonating the room the thing you think about, just articulate the airflow with your T-K.

After doing this for 10 days, you’re ready to speed this up, keeping all the basics in place. You can also use different notes, starting with F#, then G#, then F, then Ab… and only use one note at a time like you did with the second line G to begin with.

Once you can do it on one note down to low G and top of staff G, then start doing the double tongue studies in the Arban book.

Always focus on resonating the room, get the sound out there no matter what you are playing.

Here’s a video that someone did that’s pretty good on more advanced double tongue development after you do the above.

http://mphmusic.com/blog/trumpet/how-to-improve-your-trumpet-double-tonguing

Hope that helps,
Mark

Get a copy of the Advancing Trumpet player at this link

Get more Advancing Trumpet Player tips – click here

The Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #1

May 30, 2016 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #1

I received this note from one of our customers, and I thought others may benefit from my answers too…

I have been making some progress through the lessons but my practice time has been somewhat restricted lately. I am concerned that I will spend one session warming up and then have little to no time for further lesson progression or just practicing music. Is there an expedited warm up regimen I can use. I have seen 20 minute plans and others.

Second what should I use as a metric or success before I move on through the parts of each lesson? No mistakes/perfect tempo,  1,2,3 mistakes? My concern with some of the Arban’s and even your practice lines is I might never play it perfectly. Or do you just play the lines once through ignoring mistakes and work to correct them the second time around?

Hope these questions make sense.
Any advice is appreciated.

Thanks, L.

And my note back to him…

Hi L.,

Try this for the warmup routine.

Do all of 1-5.  This is basically a warmup.  Get the lips vibrating, get the air moving, sound clearing, embouchure responding to tongue and slur, and some flexibility too.

Then for the other exercises (which are a daily routine to cover more areas of playing), do lines 1,3,5,7 one day, then line 1,2,4,6 the next.  This assures you are covering all of each at least a few times during the week, and shortening the time.

As far as progressing through lessons week by week….

It is really at your own pace, and how picky and tough you want to be on yourself.

I’d rather have you play things slower, with a great sound on every note, and not necessarily the whole exercise meaning you can divide it up into doing a line at a time, etc – and piece it all together over time).

For the tonality studies (section 2), this works fine, because after the first 3 months you will be doing one tonality a day as improvement and review … and your sound, playing, and technique will be improving continuously.

For section 3 (Arbans) – same things, slower with great sound and accuracy is better than fast and bad. This approach yields the best results in the shortest period of time.

A lot of what we do when we practice is build the automatic response systems required to play, and we really must slow things down to do it – kind of like a kid learning to ride a bike – lots of wobbling and falling at first, but once the balance and memory response is developed, away they go.

And just as they learn to keep their balance, and pedal and ride faster, so will you in speeding up the exercises that need to be speeded up … but always, even at quicker speeds your sound must clearly resonate the room.  Each and every note.

You can read more about how to use the book at this link:  Advancing Trumpet Player

To get the book and more, see The Advancing Trumpet Player book

Best,
Mark Hendricks

.

David Cooper says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player

May 23, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerDavid Cooper says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player

Hi Mark,

I love your book “The Advancing Trumpet Player”.

It is quite a routine and works everything associated with trumpet playing.

The tonality studies really help to learn your scales and flexibility!!

I miss some days because of my work schedule but seem to pick up where I left off.

I do wish that there was more time for Trumpet!!!

This book is a major asset – Thanks Mark!!

David Cooper
Cataula, GA

Hey David, thanks so much for sharing your comments with everyone.

One of the biggest problems we all have in practicing is coming up with an action plan, a track to run on.

ATP is designed to be that kind of action plan.

You simply follow the lesson plans that are included, and if we get knocked off track for a little while, it’s easy to pickup where you left off and get back on the plan.

And there’s plenty of variety to keep your practice sessions interesting and challenging too.

If you have a copy already, dig in and stick with it… you will get great results.

If you don’t have your copy yet, get yours today.  It comes with my personal 100% money-back satisfaction guarantee.

Get it here:  http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

.

The Advancing Trumpet Player – here’s what David Cooper says

May 23, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – here’s what David Cooper says

Hi Mark,

I love your book “The Advancing Trumpet Player”.

It is quite a routine and works everything associated with trumpet playing.

The tonality studies really help to learn your scales and flexibility!!

I miss some days because of my work schedule but seem to pick up where I left off.

I do wish that there was more time for Trumpet!!!

This book is a major asset – Thanks Mark!!

David Cooper
Cataula, GA

Hey David, thanks so much for sharing your comments with everyone.

One of the biggest problems we all have in practicing is coming up with an action plan, a track to run on.

ATP is designed to be that kind of action plan.

You simply follow the lesson plans that are included, and if we get knocked off track for a little while, it’s easy to pickup where you left off and get back on the plan.

And there’s plenty of variety to keep your practice sessions interesting and challenging too.

If you have a copy already, dig in and stick with it… you will get great results.

If you don’t have your copy yet, get yours today.  It comes with my personal 100% money-back satisfaction guarantee.

Get it here:  http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

.

Wayne Johnson comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

April 30, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerWayne Johnson comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

I received my ATP on Saturday and it is just what I needed!

I’m a “comeback player” with about 5 years back on the horn after 19 years off. I was doing pretty good until I had to have major dental work and I had to basically start over from scratch. I needed a structured plan that covers all aspects of playing and ATP does just that!

Thank you for writing this book, it is just what the doctor ordered!!

As an added extra to the ATP is that my family prefers it over the routine I was doing before!  My wife says it sounds more musical, like I’m prepping for a concert.

Thanks again Mark!

Wayne Johnson
Bakersfield, CA

Hi Wayne,

And thank you so much for sending in your comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book.

Now that your experiencing it for yourself, you know the studies and routines in it will be ones that you’ll benefit from for many years to come to continually improve your all-around playing and keep you in shape too – you’ll be ready for anything they throw at you, no matter what kinds of playing situations you find yourself in. Glad to hear your wife likes the new you too!

And if you’ve been thinking about getting your own copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player, go ahead and order yours today. Just begin with lesson one (I’ve provided 52 lessons) and you’ll start seeing improvement in your playing, and get more enjoyment from it too, just like others do.

Here’s where to get your copy:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book from Wayne Johnson

April 30, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerComments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book from Wayne Johnson

I received my ATP on Saturday and it is just what I needed!

I’m a “comeback player” with about 5 years back on the horn after 19 years off. I was doing pretty good until I had to have major dental work and I had to basically start over from scratch. I needed a structured plan that covers all aspects of playing and ATP does just that!

Thank you for writing this book, it is just what the doctor ordered!!

As an added extra to the ATP is that my family prefers it over the routine I was doing before!  My wife says it sounds more musical, like I’m prepping for a concert.

Thanks again Mark!

Wayne Johnson
Bakersfield, CA

Hi Wayne,

And thank you so much for sending in your comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book.

Now that your experiencing it for yourself, you know the studies and routines in it will be ones that you’ll benefit from for many years to come to continually improve your all-around playing and keep you in shape too – you’ll be ready for anything they throw at you, no matter what kinds of playing situations you find yourself in. Glad to hear your wife likes the new you too!

And if you’ve been thinking about getting your own copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player, go ahead and order yours today. Just begin with lesson one (I’ve provided 52 lessons) and you’ll start seeing improvement in your playing, and get more enjoyment from it too, just like others do.

Here’s where to get your copy:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

The Advancing Trumpet Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

April 21, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Tonality Studies, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

The most important rule – it’s better to play slow and correct, than fast and bad. If you practice playing incorrectly, you will only reinforce incorrect playing.

An interesting thought on these tonality studies – all of the commentary below applies to each of the tonalities, but what you will find is in each of the tonalities, each of the exercises will present different challenges due to range, fingerings, intonation, aperture, tongue levels, etc.

#1 – Believe or not, this is an interval study. Yes, the interval you on working on is the chromatic 1/2 step. Strive to have each and every note resonate clearly. Blow through the valves and out into the room. Get your tone to match on each note. Take your time, don’t rush. Think of this as a long tone study and move the air through the whole exercise. When tonguing, connect each note to the next, leave no space between the notes. Full value notes, not staccato. It’s all one long tone, your tongue is just articulating the beginning of each pitch.

#2 – Play with a full sound, not loud, just full. Once again this is all one long tone. Be sure you are not sliding between notes to get to the next note, it’s either one note or the other. Minimize the movement of your face and jaw as much as possible, use the beginning note as the homebase for your embouchure as you move through this exercise.

#3 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#4 – Practicing these slowly is good, focus on getting your fingers to work at the correct time. You may wish to repeat each two bar phrase. Make sure to keep the air moving past the values and resonate the room with each note. Match the tone quality on each note.

#5, 6, 7 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#8 –  When first learning the two octave chromatic scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave chromatic scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out.

#9 – Play with a full singing style sound. Make this study as musically beautiful as you possibly can. Resonate the room with a full and relaxed sound.

#10 – Each note needs to speak clearly. Don’t make them too short, each note should resonate. Be sure to play this one three times, and get it to sound great the first time through it.

#11 – Once again, think of this as one long tone, it’s one stream of air, but the pitch changes each beat. No separation between notes, no sliding between notes. Listen closely to your intonation, know ahead of time the pitch center of the note you are about to play, then play that note right in it’s most resonant center.  Use all indicated articulations so you learn to come into the notes from every which way.

#12 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the double tongue articulation. It’s okay to slow down the double tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the T-K that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#13 – Each note should flow into the next one. You may want to also practice this all slurred so that you get the feeling of it all being one long tone, then go back and add the slur-two tongue-two articulation. Make this sound effortless.

#14/15 – Play full value sixteenth notes, don’t try to play them short, they’re already short. Connect each note to the next, with the tongue only activating to define the beginning of the notes. Use all indicated articulations.

#16/17 – Practice this slowly and memorize it. Get the feel for the free air flow up and down the arpeggio. Make it sound easy and effortless. Stay relaxed as you ascend and descend. Use all indicated articulations.

#18 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the triple tongue articulations. It’s okay to slow down the triple tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the TTK and TKT that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#19 – Playing these slowly is just fine. You are after accuracy and tone quality. You can learn these by playing two beats at a time ending on the next downbeat, then start on that note and do the same, two beats and end on the next downbeat. Then go back and put it all together. Use all indicated articulations.

#20 – Just as in the two octave chromatic study, when first learning the two octave whole tone scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave whole tone scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out. The whole tone scale will force you to hear the center of the next pitch so you can resonate the tone as soon as you play it.

#21 – Learn these augmented arpeggios one measure at a time, play a measure and end on the next downbeat. Start on the second measure and end on the next downbeat, and so on. Get the sound of these augmented chords in your head so you know where you are going with the pitch of each note so it resonates the room when you play each one. Once you have this, string the whole study together as one. Use all indicated articulations. Keep that air moving, it’s all one long tone. And resonate the room with every note.

#22 – Take your time, play it slowly. Rest between each section. Go for a full and beautiful singing sound, each note is clear and resonates the room. Match the tone quality of one note to the next, each note connects without break to the next. Use all indicated articulations.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

 

 

 

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Tom Hall says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

April 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerTom Hall says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

I have been using The Advancing Trumpet Player for about 5 months. My sound, range, and endurance have all improved dramatically!

Mark’s books really do work!

Tom Hall
Retired Band Director and
Life-long trumpet player
Iowa Falls, IA

Hi Tom,

Thanks for your comments you posted on Facebook recently.

Best to you … Mark

If you haven’t gotten your copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player yet, go ahead and order it today. Be assured if you simply follow the lesson plans in the book, you will improve all aspects of your playing just like Tom did.

If you already have a copy, dig in and do the program. Some simple disciplined practice that progresses step by step is exactly what you need, and The Advancing Trumpet Player does that for you.

Order yours today, or at least get our free Trumpet Players Sample Pack … but don’t put this off, take some action now, you deserve it…

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Tom Hall says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

April 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerTom Hall says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

I have been using The Advancing Trumpet Player for about 5 months. My sound, range, and endurance have all improved dramatically!

Mark’s books really do work!

Tom Hall
Retired Band Director and
Life-long trumpet player
Iowa Falls, IA

Hi Tom,

Thanks for your comments you posted on Facebook recently.

Best to you … Mark

If you haven’t gotten your copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player yet, go ahead and order it today. Be assured if you simply follow the lesson plans in the book, you will improve all aspects of your playing just like Tom did.

If you already have a copy, dig in and do the program. Some simple disciplined practice that progresses step by step is exactly what you need, and The Advancing Trumpet Player does that for you.

Order yours today, or at least get our free Trumpet Players Sample Pack … but don’t put this off, take some action now, you deserve it…

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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The Advancing Trumpet Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

April 16, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Warmup Routine, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

When you first start using the book, in the first session (the Warmup Routine), just play exercises 1-4 and 17 the first week.  Then the second week add one more exercise (ie 1-5 and 17), then the third week add one more exercise (ie 1-6 and 17) and continue in this pattern until you are playing exercises 1-17 of the Warmup Routine daily.  If at any time the additional added exercise is not to your liking (still difficult) at the end of the practice week, then stay with that routine for another week or so until you it becomes easier for you.

#1 – The breath attack on the first note G of each set is to let your lips know that when you release the air stream you really want your lips to vibrate and instantly create your sound. Be sure to have your air pressure in place before starting the sound, the sound should start instantly. Exhale, inhale, release, resonate the room with your sound.

Match the tone color of the fingered notes to the open G sound. As you move your way down and up the scale, match the tone quality of each note to the others. Because you are using different valve combinations the tone quality will change, it’s up to you to make minor adjustments to get the tone quality to match note for note. Make sure to not slide the pitch from one to another, the pitch of each note should happen instantly. Keep the air moving through the valve changes. Always fill the room with your sound. Resonate the room.

Take the horn off your lips after each fermata. Rest as long as you just played. Note that each line of this exercise gets longer in length, learn to regulate your air flow, in and out.  After you’re done, rest at least two minutes, more is good.

#2 – Now we add the tongue attack (T) on the notes.  Get those first two eighth notes to resonate the room, they should not be staccato, just a full eighth note. By resonate the room, I don’t mean loud, rather get the feeling that you are filling the room with your sound to all the corners of the room and you can hear it coming back to you. This is not echo. It is you exciting the air in the room with your playing. Always, no matter what you are playing, resonate the room.

In measure two, three and four, connect the notes, do not slide between the notes. The note pitches are one or another, little notches of tone. Keep the air moving, think of everything as one long tone. Rest as marked.

#3 – Match the tone quality of each note, the fingered lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the fingered lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the fingered upper neighbor tone, the slur down, the fingered upper neighbor tone, and the slur down and hold. Keep the air moving, it’s all one long tone, just the pitches you play are different. Resonate the room.

#4 – Going from note 1 to note 2, it’s either the Db or the Bb, there is no Gb in the middle (same on the other valve combinations on the first two notes).  Then keep the air moving and slur down and up without sliding from note to note. Listen to yourself closely, each note has it’s pitch and tone quality, match them and smooth out any glitches.  All one long tone, resonate the room.

#5 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#6 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed.  When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#7 – It’s all one long tone, you are just changing pitches along the way. Match the tone quality pitch to pitch, especially the top note of the sets, keep the air moving all the way up and back down. No sliding, each note counts, each note resonates the room.

#8 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed.  When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#9/10 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#11 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed.  When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#12 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#13 – Wow, look at all of those Db notes. That 1-2-3 valve combination is the longest your trumpet gets, and it takes a little more concentration to get your horn to speak compared to other notes, and it’s up to you to make this happen. This study helps you learn how to match the tone quality going from longest to all the other valve combinations too, plus make it happen over a few different overtone partials. Be sure to do all of the articulations, this assures you are approaching this issue from every which way to get your chops working efficiently.  And remember, it’s all one long tone.  Oh, and… resonate the room.

#14/15 – Full length sixteenth notes, don’t try to play staccato, they are already short notes.  Resonate each one, every note counts, no fluffs accepted. Match the tone quality each note to the others, listen closely to the intonation of each note so you are playing the middle of the pitch when you attack the note. Keep reminding yourself that it’s all one long tone, the air keeps moving all the way from the first note through the last note. Get used to using that 3rd valve slide to get that Db in tune, it needs to be out for the Db and D, and for the 2-3 combinations (Eb and Ab) it’s in.  You can leave it out on anything other than 2-3, no airflow is going out the 3rd valve tubing if you don’t have the 3rd valve pushed down.

#16 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#17 – Go for a relaxed and resonate sound. Fill the room with your sound, not loud, just resonate.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

 

 

 

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Charlie Sweet comments on All The Notes and More

April 13, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for TrumpetCharlie Sweet comments on All The Notes and More

Mark,

I have The Advancing Trumpet Player, Give It The 3rd Finger, and All The Notes and More.

I believe the All The Notes and More book is by far the best book for me.

It has all the pertinent, practical scales. and the exercises in all tonalities. I especially like the blues scales as I am playing in two jazz bands. It is also helping me get my range back.  I am a returning trumpet player (five years ago) and trying to get started in the right direction, this book is definitely working for me.

I highly recommend this book.

Charlie Sweet
Grand Junction, CO

Hi Charlie,

Thanks for sharing your comments with everybody, and thanks for purchasing the three books, and I’m delighted you are finding them all valuable to you.

Each book I publish typically targets a specific area of playing, however they are all written to create an efficient and effective way to practice so you get more accomplished in less time.  I think that’s what most people find when they really follow the practice plans in each book, and stick with the systematized approach.

If you’re reading this and haven’t gotten your copies of my study books for trumpet, trombone, or sax – check out these pages…

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

http://mphmusic.com/trombone

http://mphmusic.com/saxophone

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Chuck Seipp talks about Mark’s books

February 16, 2016 by · 3 Comments
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Chuck Seipp talks about Mark’s books

Chuck SeippI am teaching at the college level but also teach students from age 10 to 70 and have for quite some time. When I met Mark Hendricks at the Trumpet Fest in Tampa October of 2015, I was immediately impressed by his passion to publish his well thought-out approach of all his trumpet books. At that event, I witnessed the enthusiasm of both teachers and students who have been using his materials. Mark’s love of the trumpet and compassion for students of the trumpet resulted in wonderfully creative books that needs to be in every trumpet players library and used daily.

Besides his books, Mark Hendricks has the most impressive website with information and resources valuable to all trumpet players.

If you are an amateur or student you will see results in little time with Mark Hendricks books.

If you are a professional you will understand immediately the benefits of incorporating his books into your daily routine.

If you are a teacher, better still, now you have a wonderful teaching aid to help your students.

Chuck Seipp
Associate Professor of Trumpet
Shenandoah Conservatory, Winchester VA
The United States Army Band, “Pershing’s Own” (Retired)
www.cjseippmusic.com

A few comments about the books…

The Comeback Trumpet Player: A wonderful book with a collection of great exercises, well thought-out that cover all aspects of playing with a 52-lesson plan. A plan can be confusing to any player and Mark has a solid systematic approach that can guide the comeback trumpet player to success the quickest way possible. This book includes excellent tips, fundamental warm ups and exercises by Mark Hendricks as well as exercises of James Stamp, Don Owen and Arbans. Not just for the comeback player, this book is proven to develop all aspects of the trumpet – tone, tonguing, technique, flexibility, endurance and range.

Forty-Nine Long Lost Arban Duets (…that Arban never wrote): A fun book of duets created for many of the classic Arbans exercises I use weekly with students which helps focus on matching articulation, style, rhythm precision, ensemble, intonation and awareness of how to lead ensemble play.

Give It The 3rd Finger: A creative book by Mark Hendricks, which focuses on developing the coordination of the trumpeter’s weakest finger. We all know the frustration of our fingers not cooperating and this book really helps finger dexterity in a practical, fun and interesting approach through Mark’s exercises, etudes and duets.

The Advancing Trumpet Player: Mark Hendricks version of “The Comeback Trumpet Player” on steroids! A creative, more advanced method for the motivated student with a systematic 52-lesson plan to focus the student with goals to improve every aspect of trumpet playing.

All the Notes and More: All the scales and arpeggios in every key in one book challenging the tongue, flexibility, endurance and range!

– – – –

Thanks Chuck for sharing your thoughts with our customers and readers.

If you get a chance to hear Chuck play or take a lesson or study with him for a while, you’ll find him to be one of the nicest guys and a great trumpet player on top of that!!

By the way, you’ve probably heard of one of his younger students who has been studying trumpet with Chuck since 2006….  Geoff Gallante – that’s a link to some Youtube videos featuring Geoff, quite the talent!

To get more info on our books click the following links:

Trumpet

Trombone

Saxophone – Reeds

And you can read comments from other people too at http://mphmusic.com/blog/category/comments/

 

 

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Transposition for Trumpet Players

January 20, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Trumpet 

Concone Studies for TrumpetTransposition for Trumpet Players

Transposition for trumpet players is expected.

So if you haven’t already learned how to do this, get going.

If you have learned, it’s something that does get a little rusty unless you do it a little every day or so.

Here’s how to learn and master the skill of transposition for trumpet players…

Get this book:

Concone Studies: http://www.mphmusic.com/go/concone

Then work through it one by one…. first play as written, no transposition – just to get the tunes in your head – and assuming you are starting all of this on your Bb trumpet .

Then begin the transposing the studies for C trumpet…. A trumpet …  D trumpet… Eb…. F…. etc. (see transposition guide below).

This will work on transposition plus music phrasing, tone, air, etc.

It’s also good to get a church hymnal book (4 part harmony on two staves), and learn to transpose the top two parts (treble clef), and for a little more challenge learn to do it from the bass clef parts too 🙂 … if you ever play in church, knowing how to do this will really come in handy.

A more advanced book or two…

Bordogni: http://www.mphmusic.com/go/bordogni

Caffarelli: http://www.mphmusic.com/go/caffarelli

Start with the Concone Studies and church hymnal book.  🙂

Transposition Guide (you may already know this):

If you have a Bb Trumpet in your hands…

If the part is in Bb trumpet, then play it as written

If the part is in C trumpet, then play up 1 whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in A trumpet, then play down 1 half step (minor 2nd)

If the part is in D trumpet, then play up a major 3rd

If the part is in Eb trumpet, then play up a perfect 4th

If the part is in E trumpet, then play up a tritone

If the part is in F trumpet, then play up a perfect 5th

If the part is in G trumpet, then play up a major sixth

If the part is in Ab trumpet, then play down 1 whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in B trumpet, then play up 1 half step (minor 2nd)

If you have a C trumpet in your hands….

If the part is in Bb trumpet, then play it down a whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in C trumpet, then play it as written

If the part is in A trumpet, then play down a minor 3rd

If the part is in D trumpet, then play up a whole step (major 2nd)

If the part is in Eb trumpet, then play up a minor 3rd

If the part is in E trumpet, then play up a major 3rd

If the part is in F trumpet, then play up a perfect 4th

If the part is in G trumpet, then play up a perfect 5th

If the part is in Ab trumpet, then play down major 3rd

If the part is in B trumpet, then play down 1 half step (minor 2nd)

One way to approach transposition is to know what note number of the scale you are looking at on the page. Such as in the key of C, the note F is the fourth note (4). So if you were playing a Bb trumpet and you see the page showing the key signature of C and it is a C trumpet part, you would play a G, which is the fourth note of a D scale. D is one whole step above the written key signature of C.

That’s why it’s really, really good to practice and know from memory all of your scales, arpeggios, etc. — the books on this page link will prove to be very valuable to you over the years (hint: get going now 🙂 ) –  See The Advancing Trumpet Player, The Comeback Trumpet Player, All The Notes and More!… at: http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark

To all of our world-wide customers and readers, thank you

January 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Mark HendricksTo all of our world-wide customers and readers, thank you!

Thank you to all of our customers and readers world-wide in the following countries, we appreciate you – be sure to visit our website for lots of interesting articles, videos, products, and services at http://MPHmusic.com

Albania, Andorra, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Faroe Islands, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of Serbia, Romania, Russian Federation, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States, Venezuela, Vietnam, Virgin Islands

We appreciate you so much!

Mark Hendricks
http://MPHmusic.com

Skype Lessons with Mark Hendricks

December 31, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Skype Lessons 

SkypeSkype Lessons with Mark Hendricks

The great thing about the internet is how it makes it possible for me to serve people all over the world.

If you have an interest in studying music with me, whether it be trumpet lessons, composing/arranging, jazz improvisation for any instrument, or general music theory… you can contact me and we will do a free 30 minute session just to see if I can help you (this can be done on Skype or the telephone).

If you find that the time we spend together has been valuable, then we can set up a scheduled time we meet by way of Skype each week.

Click this link for more details: http://mphmusic.com/skype

And you can read more about my background and experience here: http://mphmusic.com/about.htm

 

 

 

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Hey Trumpet Players – here’s a great freebie for you!

December 21, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Trumpet 

FreeHey Trumpet Players – here’s a great freebie for you!

(updated as of 12/21/15 – download again for the newest version)

It’s the Trumpet Players Sample Pack.

These are sample studies and exercises from our books for trumpet you can add to your practice routines. And if you like them, we’re guessing you’ll want to purchase the complete print books too.

Here’s how to get the Trumpet Players Sample Pack, click this link and see the top of the page:

http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

Oh, one other thing…Be sure to check out out blog for lots of videos, event
updates and more at:http://www.mphmusic.com/blog
And also LIKE our Facebook page at:http://www.facebook.com/mphmusicdotcom

You can share this message with your friends,
I know they will appreciate you thinking of them.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

The Advancing Trumpet Player – Quick Start Guide

December 19, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Quick Start Guide

First of all…

Congratulations on your purchase of The Advancing Trumpet Player book!

You’re embarking on a great journey complete with challenges and rewards…  frustrations and fun too!

Here’s a few tips on getting starting using the ATP book:

1. Read the written materials in the front of the book during your rest time within your practice sessions, let the information there really sink in (read it many, many times).

2. When you first start using the ATP book, in the first session (the Warmup Routine), just play exercises 1-4 and 17 the first week.  Then the second week add one more exercise (ie 1-5 and 17), then the third week add one more exercise (ie 1-6 and 17) and continue in this pattern until you are playing exercises 1-17 of the Warmup Routine daily.  If at any time the additional added exercise is not to your liking (still difficult) at the end of the practice week, then stay with that routine for another week or so until you it becomes easier for you.

3. Always rest as much as you play DURING your practice sessions, not just between your practice sessions. You should still feel fresh at the end of the practice sessions, if not then rest more during the session. You don’t get better by playing incorrectly on beat up chops. Always strive to practice correctly. When you perform or rehearse with others, just play (your correct practice habits will be with you).

4. It’s really okay to play the tonality studies S-L-O-W-L-Y. Go for air flow (think of each exercise as one continuous long tone of air), resonant sound on every note (fill the room with your sound, no matter the length of the note), clean attack and articulations, etc. What you are wanting to do with slow practice is to give your body a chance to learn to coordinate all of the “moving parts” of trumpet playing so that it becomes second nature (subconscious reflexes) and carries forward into the study when you incrementally speed it up to quicker tempo.

5. Practice all of the articulations notated (ie S, T, K, TK, TTK, TKT, Breath). This will get your embouchure learning to play each note in every which way and whatever direction.

6. When playing from the tonalities section, or the Arban’s studies section, or any other thing you practice… it’s okay to practice one measure at a time, or even two beats at a time, or whatever. You can always string things back together and play longer stretches of music as you get better. It’s more important to play correctly for short periods, than incorrectly for long periods of time.

7. In the fourth session of the lessons, play as musically as you can. Those short little songs in the Arban book are full of twists and turns that really can give your chops a good workout and get you playing with finesse, and if you do them as I prescribe, your chops will feel fresh at the end of that session. Follow the instructions in the fourth session on how to alternate in the full range studies a few days a week also.

8. Always strive to play with the best tone possible. That’s what people hear, so why not be aware of it all the time when you practice. If you really sound great, chances are you are playing correctly. Always be thinking to resonate the room, not just the horn. This is not loudness volume, this is resonance. You will hear the room “feed back” the sound to your ears when you get it right. This is not echo. It is more of a thickness of your sound in the air that resonates while you play.

9. Always strive to make your practicing sound musical – make music, that’s the ultimate end game, so do it all along the way too.

10. Consider taking some lessons, either locally with a good instructor, or with me via Skype (yes, it really does work well, and I am very, very good at coaching you along your ATP trail).

11. Contact some local ensembles and get going on playing with others (see this page for ideas).

NOTE: if you purchased and received ATP prior to January 14, 2016… there is a typo on page 117, Lesson #7 – Session 2.  It should just read Eb Tonality – disregard anything else in that box.

12. Have fun and enjoy the ride!

You’ll find some other ATP tips here.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Four trumpet books on sale now

March 18, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Music 

We’ve got four great trumpet books on sale right now at a 20% discount.

And you can see some free sample pages from each of them at the website page.

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for TrumpetAll The Notes and More!

70 studies in each of the 12 tonalities designed to help you develop and maintain your tone, tonguing, technique, flexibility, endurance, range, and more no matter what styles you play. In it you will practice and master all kinds of scales and arpeggios in all ranges of your instrument. They are the necessary building blocks of music, and all top performers have them ingrained into their playing so they can perform at the highest levels of musicianship.

 

 

 

FORTY-NINE LONG LOST ARBAN DUETS FOR TRUMPET (...that Arban never wrote!)49 Arban Duets for Trumpet (…that Arban never wrote!)

The original studies written by J.B. Arban that are the basis for these forty-nine duets are among the
most assigned, practiced, played, and reviewed by all trumpet players – beginner, intermediate, advanced, and pro alike. But there were never duets based on them… until now! Practicing and playing them with your friends, students, and colleagues will yield tremendous benefits for all involved.

 

 

Give It The 3rd Finger for Trumpet - 101 Studies, plus Etudes and DuetsGive It The 3rd Finger – 101 Studies with 12 Etudes and Matching Duets

You know what I’m talking about, it’s the one that really hangs you up when you’re playing scales and arpeggios, and completely messes you up when you’re really trying to impress your friends and amaze your audiences 😉

All of the studies, etudes, and duets in this book target your 3rd finger while playing a variety of interesting patterns, articulations, and ranges. Developing your 3rd finger strength, technique, and coordination will improve all of your abilities to play with more agility, musicality, and confidence.

 

The Comeback Trumpet PlayerThe Comeback Trumpet Player

The Comeback Trumpet Player book can be used by all trumpet players – whether you’ve laid-off 2 weeks, 2 months, 2 years, and especially 20 years or more this book will get you in shape and keep you in shape too.

The “CTP” system consists of four sessions per day: warm-up, tonality study, Arban’s book studies, and endurance/range/musicianship studies. This will take approximately two hours per day divided into four sessions, with breaks in between. Don’t try to play all of the assignments in one session, you really do need the rest to keep your embouchure fresh all day and ready again for the next day.

Take a look and let your buddies know too at:

http://MPHmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm

And be sure to check our blog for updates, like the four terrific Trumpet Festivals that are coming up soon, see this page for details:

http://mphmusic.com/blog/category/events/

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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