The Advancing Trumpet Player – Jeff Brandt says

May 31, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

Mark,

The books you have recently written, are ALL just fantastic! ”

“Give It The 3rd Finger” has certainly turned out to be a hit with people as I watch posts about it.

But, I have to tell you, “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book, has been extremely helpful to me!

The combination of all the things you put in there, from all the years from many different teachers, brought back to memory all those things, and IF, IF I would just do them daily as you state, I really begin to improve quickly, and gain back many of the strengths I once had, and I improve with much less stress. Your book WORKS wonders! It is a true must for trumpet players who want to improve or maintain. It’s great Mark.

Thanks for putting so much time, thought and effort into such a excellent resource for all of us ! You are a blessing, in many, many ways!

Sincerely,

Jeff Brandt
Director of Music Ministries and Solo Trumpeter
New Hope United Methodist Church
Valrico, Florida

Jeff, thanks so much for your kind words, and it makes me feel great that “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book has helped you so much.

For those trumpeters who want to chack out why Jeff was so excited to write, here’s a link to all the trumpet books….

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

And if you play trombone or sax, here’s a link for you too…

http://mphmusic.com

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Comments from Owen Klug about the Advancing Trombone Player

October 11, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowComments from Owen Klug about the Advancing Trombone Player

Hi Mark,

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP. Thanks again, Owen Klug

Here’s a few comments that I have that may help others…

I had stopped playing for about 45+/- years. I gave everything away except the horn.

After retiring, I needed something to do and my horn was the answer. I played in several bands – from concert, swing, rock…etc. I was also in the ARMY Show Band.

I practiced and reached a level of proficiency that got me into 3 concert bands and 3 big swing/dance bands. then I seemed to plateau-out (did not get any better).

I think I heard about you and your method books through the internet… not sure.

The thing I’m finding the most effective about the Advancing Trombone Player book and system
is the exercises and the amount of exercises in each lesson. And the practice time required.

The thing I’m liking and impressed with the most is how quick I started improving again after leaving that initial plateau I was on.

The difference is your approach, I think.  The amount of exercises and the various types of challenging exercises you provide.  This differs from other lesson types. In addition, your lesson plans require more practice time and are more demanding. This is definitely a Good Thing.

The most obvious result I’ve noticed so far is my capabilities mature much faster and that helps and enhances my confidence level. I don’t feel so challenged when playing in bands.

I’m happy to tell you I’ve already recommended the Advancing Trombone Player to others, telling them how much my confidence level has increased since I started using the ATP.

One other thing, a little insight about Mark — he is very supportive and goes out of his way to help you improve and achieve your goals.

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP.

Thanks again, Owen Klug

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

Hi Owen, Mark here…

Thanks for sharing your comments and enthusiasm in your success using the Advancing Trombone Player method book system. I can tell you are putting in the disciplined practice time and follow the lesson plans, that the quickest way to get the most results in the least amount of time.  And as time goes by, as you progress through all of the lessons, things will continue you improve at an even quicker rate.

Congratulations, and thanks again for sharing your thoughts.

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

Comments about The Comeback Trumpet Player from Peter Flournoy

August 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Comeback Trumpet PlayerComments about The Comeback Trumpet Player from Peter Flournoy

Mark:

I am a comeback trumpet player and perform about 3-4 times per year at my church (either with piano or organ accompaniment or with the full choir). I began practicing again in late June for a church performance about a week ago and found your book to be valuable as I work to regain my chops.

I also especially like the warm up section, but find that I do not have the time to practice for more than about an hour per day. As such, I am taking your advice to practice parts of each lesson and alternate as I go.

I am finding my flexibility, endurance and range improving as I go.

Looking forward to working with your books and lesson plans throughout the end of this year and into next!!! I am really finding your book to be useful and helpful as I work to rebuild my chops!!

Thanks for providing a valuable and useful resource for those of us trying to get back in the game!!

With great appreciation,

Peter Flournoy
Norwalk, CT

Hi Peter, Mark here.

Thanks for your comments about The Comeback Trumpet trumpet book.

Sounds like you’re putting it to good use, and have customized your practice routine using the guidelines I gave you in the practice tips blogpost of alternating exercises every other day so you do get to all of them instead of just skipping around. Bravo!

By following the disciplined system of lesson plans you get a well-rounded approach to practicing all facets of playing in a balanced way, and you always know where to pick up again if you get side-tracked.

Thanks again for sharing your experience.

Mark Hendricks

You can get more info, free samples and order your copy of The Comeback Trumpet Player book at this link The Comeback Trumpet Player

And read practice tips and comments from other at this link Comeback Trumpet Player Tips

 

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Peter Flournoy says this about The Comeback Trumpet Player

August 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comeback Trumpet Player 

The Comeback Trumpet PlayerPeter Flournoy says this about The Comeback Trumpet Player

Mark:

I am a comeback trumpet player and perform about 3-4 times per year at my church (either with piano or organ accompaniment or with the full choir). I began practicing again in late June for a church performance about a week ago and found your book to be valuable as I work to regain my chops.

I also especially like the warm up section, but find that I do not have the time to practice for more than about an hour per day. As such, I am taking your advice to practice parts of each lesson and alternate as I go.

I am finding my flexibility, endurance and range improving as I go.

Looking forward to working with your books and lesson plans throughout the end of this year and into next!!! I am really finding your book to be useful and helpful as I work to rebuild my chops!!

Thanks for providing a valuable and useful resource for those of us trying to get back in the game!!

With great appreciation,

Peter Flournoy
Norwalk, CT

Hi Peter, Mark here.

Thanks for your comments about The Comeback Trumpet trumpet book.

Sounds like you’re putting it to good use, and have customized your practice routine using the guidelines I gave you in the practice tips blogpost of alternating exercises every other day so you do get to all of them instead of just skipping around. Bravo!

By following the disciplined system of lesson plans you get a well-rounded approach to practicing all facets of playing in a balanced way, and you always know where to pick up again if you get side-tracked.

Thanks again for sharing your experience.

Mark Hendricks

You can get more info, free samples and order your copy of The Comeback Trumpet Player book at this link The Comeback Trumpet Player

And read practice tips and comments from other at this link Comeback Trumpet Player Tips

 

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Comments from Dave Dennis on The Comeback Trumpet Player book

August 16, 2016 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Comeback Trumpet PlayerComments from Dave Dennis on The Comeback Trumpet Player book

Hi Mark,

I have found The Comeback Trumpet Player  book an effective way to renew my acquaintance with my cornet. I am practicing up on my 1941 Conn 80a after — shall we say– more than 20 years. I had it restored earlier this year.  The old horn is slowly learning to sing again.

Having started from liver lips I have had considerable progress. The warm up section is especially valuable. I found the “rest as you play” instruction to be encouraging, especially when I was inventing notes that do not have  a place on any scale. The reminder to go slow and play well is helpful in coordinating rusty habits as well as replacing some unhelpful ones. Previously I had not given much thought to warm-down. Exercise 16 in the opening section really ends a practice session with a sense of relaxation. Because my cornet is larger bore the number of lower tones and bottom mid-range is helping me to build a tone I like. When I bust a note toward the top of my present range the “three strikes and you’re out” teaches patience and restrains my compulsions to overdo it. I chose to start with the G tonality studies. I appreciate the major and minor scale studies. My fingers are learning to cooperate again!

Your assigned Arban exercises gives me additional challenge as well as something to do during rest stops. My well-traveled book has now begun to molt and keeping the pages in order require attention. Gosh, it’s not even fifty years old yet! It is truly and old friend.

For those thinking about or starting up again, I highly recommend The Comeback Trumpet Player. It is varied enough to keep you interested and rigorous without being discouraging.

Keep on playing,

Dave Dennis
Knoxville, TN

Hi, Mark here…

Thanks Dave for your comments about The Comeback Trumpet Player systematic method book for trumpet players.

If you’re a Comeback Trumpet Player, this will help get you on track and keep you on track for years to come.

Read all about it at http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

If you’re more advanced already, I suggest you pick up The Advancing Trumpet player (you will see it at that same webpage).

More about The Comeback Trumpet Player – Tips and Comments

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Comeback Trumpet Player Dave Dennis says this

August 16, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comeback Trumpet Player 

The Comeback Trumpet PlayerComeback Trumpet Player Dave Dennis says this

Hi Mark,

I have found The Comeback Trumpet Player  book an effective way to renew my acquaintance with my cornet. I am practicing up on my 1941 Conn 80a after — shall we say– more than 20 years. I had it restored earlier this year.  The old horn is slowly learning to sing again.

Having started from liver lips I have had considerable progress. The warm up section is especially valuable. I found the “rest as you play” instruction to be encouraging, especially when I was inventing notes that do not have  a place on any scale. The reminder to go slow and play well is helpful in coordinating rusty habits as well as replacing some unhelpful ones. Previously I had not given much thought to warm-down. Exercise 16 in the opening section really ends a practice session with a sense of relaxation. Because my cornet is larger bore the number of lower tones and bottom mid-range is helping me to build a tone I like. When I bust a note toward the top of my present range the “three strikes and you’re out” teaches patience and restrains my compulsions to overdo it. I chose to start with the G tonality studies. I appreciate the major and minor scale studies. My fingers are learning to cooperate again!

Your assigned Arban exercises gives me additional challenge as well as something to do during rest stops. My well-traveled book has now begun to molt and keeping the pages in order require attention. Gosh, it’s not even fifty years old yet! It is truly and old friend.

For those thinking about or starting up again, I highly recommend The Comeback Trumpet Player. It is varied enough to keep you interested and rigorous without being discouraging.

Keep on playing,

Dave Dennis
Knoxville, TN

Hi, Mark here…

Thanks Dave for your comments about The Comeback Trumpet Player systematic method book for trumpet players.

If you’re a Comeback Trumpet Player, this will help get you on track and keep you on track for years to come.

Read all about it at http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

If you’re more advanced already, I suggest you pick up The Advancing Trumpet player (you will see it at that same webpage).

More about The Comeback Trumpet Player – Tips and Comments

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

 

 

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The Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #3

July 12, 2016 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #3

Increasing endurance with little time to practice, airflow and buzzing, mouthpiece placement

One of The Advancing Trumpet Player book owners wrote to me and said…

Any advice for the comeback player using The Advancing Trumpet Player book, with people who have some time issues. Been playing 8 (come back after 25 off) years and still some of the warm ups I do totally wear me down. All of this info on air and buzzing, I’m not sure even how to set my mpc any more.

Thanks,
Mark S.

Hi Mark,

Thanks for your question.

When I was doing my comeback after 20 years of not playing, I also was frustrated with my endurance.  I remembered how I used to be able to play and play. But what I didn’t remember is the years of building up to that happened as I developed my trumpet playing. Even so, it was frustrating.

So how did I solve this?

I pulled out my Arban’s book, when to those old songs and started playing four measures at a time (usually one phrase). Then I would take the horn off my face and sing what I play and finger the notes. Then I would play the next four measures and then rest while I sang those. And continued this pattern to the end of the song. Then I would rest as much time as it took to sing through the entire song.

Then I continued this and did two pages of those songs. The next day I would start with the second page of the prior day for a little repetition of material and my second page on day two would be new.  And on and on in this pattern to the end of those old songs section.

Then I went back the first song and did eight measures, rest and sing eight, play eight, rest and sing eight, etc – and did two pages like that. Then next day, start with the second page and add the next page, etc.

Voila – I was resting as much as I was playing.

The problem is…. we hear people say “Rest as much as you play”, and we play and play for an hour, beat up our chops, then rest an hour, comeback to practice on beat up chops and wonder why things don’t work and we don’t improve.

Mark says… Rest as much as you play DURING each practice session, you should feel fresh and good at the end of your practice sessions. If you don’t, your not practicing correctly.  It does no good to practice on tired chops, you will only be developing bad habits, not good ones.

I included this “How To Increase Your Endurance The Easy Way” Special Report PDF in the Trumpet Players Sample Pack available for free at http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Now as far as air and buzzing…

Let’s focus instead on sound, your sound.  It’s what people hear.  The don’t hear your air, they don’t hear your buzzing.

Focus on resonating the room with your sound.  This is not echo.  This is a thickness of sound that surrounds you when you play as you fill the room with your sound, you literally vibrate the room with your tone.  And you don’t have to play loud to do this. It’s more of opening yourself up so your airstream is easily moving through your horn and filling the room with sound on each and every note.

How do you practice this?

Those first few warmup exercises get you going on this in the Advancing Trumpet Player book, take your time, just get into the feeling of filling the room with your sound, resonate the room. I repeat myself, but that’s what I think about… listening for the room to resonate and tell me that I am playing correctly with a full and relaxed sound on each and every note, no matter if it’s short or long, low or high, soft or loud – resonate the room with the sound concept you are wanting to have.

Once you get the feeling of this it will carry over into all of your playing, if you pay attention to it. And you must on each and every note… resonate the room.

Okay enough of resonate the room 🙂

Mouthpiece placement…

Play a second line G with a full resonant sound with a comfortable mouthpiece placement, not too far left or right, not too far up or down… just make it feel good and sound good.  Let that be home base for a while. Build everything from that second line G.  Later on you may want to use top of the staff G for your setup, but that’s for later.  Get your in the staff sound resonating first.

Some more thoughts and things to do for mouthpiece placement…

A little more for mouthpiece placement….

Get a 8×10 mirror and put it on your music stand so you can see yourself

Start with directly centered under your nose and in half and half upper and lower lips left/right in the middle, even if feels lousy at first

Then just play 2nd line G, half note, half note, whole note – horn off lips and rest that much

Reset and do the same 10 times – Mezzo Forte – but resonate the room

Just try that setup and see where it gets you.  Try it for at least 5 days like this — practice other stuff too after doing this and don’t think about placement so much, it will carry over. After the 5 days, you will probably used to it.

You may then experiment with tiny adjustments up down left right to find the spot where your chops resonate the room the best – let the sound be your guide not so much the feeling of the chops — your chops will build the embouchure to support the sound you discover that resonates the room when you play.

Slow and steady and a little of this every day, and let it carry over to your other playing.

Once this 2nd line G starts resonating for you they way you like, then do the first Full Range Study that is in The Comeback Trumpet Player book, The Advancing Trumpet Player book, and the Full Range Studies for Trumpet book. Be sure to play each valve combination slowly, take the horn off your face between each one and rest as much as you just played.  Make sure you don’t slide note to note, make your chops work and resonate well on each note. Only go as high as it is easy, with the mouthpiece placement you are not trying to build range with this exercise, but rather just get things working well in the staff. You don’t need to go higher than top of staff G for this.  And your chops should feel good after doing this, if they don’t you didn’t rest enough or you went to high.

If you don’t have these books, get the free Trumpet Players Sample Pack – this first exercise is in the Full Range Studies sample PDF, just do that first page and extend the pattern up to top of staff G. Get the sample pack at http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Remember to resonate the room as your guide to whether you are playing correctly.

Listen to the sound of the room, more than the sound of your trumpet.

Hope that helps!

Mark

To get a copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player, click here

To get more Advancing Trumpet Player tips and info, click here

The Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #2

July 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – Tips #2

How To Improve the K in Double Tonguing

One of The Advancing Trumpet Player book owners wrote to me and said…

Hello Mark,

I am working in the ATP book and trying to work on K tongue and TK. It is horrible! The slow tempo sounds so bad that I do not see how it can progress. Is this what I should expect until the K sounds like T?

Thanks for any help,

Tony

Hi Tony,

The idea and goal is to get the T and the K to sound alike.

Okay, so how do you do that?

Here’s a few things to do…

Days 1-2:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play two half notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room, do this four times
– Now play two half notes and a whole note with the same airflow and start the half notes and whole note with the K attack, more like Kuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the K (kuh) articulation

Days 3-4:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play four quarter notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play four quarter notes and a whole note with the same airflow and start the quarter notes and whole note with the K attack, more like Kuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the K (kuh) articulation

Days 5-6:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play eight eighth notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play eight eighth notes and a whole note with the same airflow and start the eighth notes and whole note with the K attack, more like Kuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the K (kuh) articulation

Days 7-8:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play four quarter notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play four quarter notes and a whole note with the same airflow and use the alternating Tuh-Kuh-Tuh-Kuh-Tuh… for the quarter notes and whole note – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the T-K-T-K-T (tuh-kuh) articulation

Days 9-10:

– Only play second line G
– Set a metronome to 92
– Play eight eighth notes and a whole note with a T attack, no separation, just let your tongue touch the airflow
– Get the feeling of that airflow with the tongue just articulating with the T – more like Tuh – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Now play eight eighth notes and a whole note with the same airflow and use the alternating Tuh-Kuh-Tuh-Kuh-Tuh… for the eighth notes and a whole note – think about filling the room with your sound, resonate the room – do this four times
– Just stay on that G, reduce this down to only having to deal with the T-K-T-K-T (tuh-kuh) articulation

Here’s what you’re training yourself to do…

– keep the air moving
– articulating the airflow with double tongueing articulations
– keeping the resonance of tone to fill the room with your sound
– keeping your mind focused on resonating each tone you play

You may also want to practice this with a softer attack of Duh-Guh-Duh-Guh-Duh.

Always keep the airflow and resonating the room the thing you think about, just articulate the airflow with your T-K.

After doing this for 10 days, you’re ready to speed this up, keeping all the basics in place. You can also use different notes, starting with F#, then G#, then F, then Ab… and only use one note at a time like you did with the second line G to begin with.

Once you can do it on one note down to low G and top of staff G, then start doing the double tongue studies in the Arban book.

Always focus on resonating the room, get the sound out there no matter what you are playing.

Here’s a video that someone did that’s pretty good on more advanced double tongue development after you do the above.

http://mphmusic.com/blog/trumpet/how-to-improve-your-trumpet-double-tonguing

Hope that helps,
Mark

Get a copy of the Advancing Trumpet player at this link

Get more Advancing Trumpet Player tips – click here

The Advancing Trombone Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

June 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trombone Player 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Tonality Studies, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

The most important rule – it’s better to play slow and correct, than fast and bad. If you practice playing incorrectly, you will only reinforce incorrect playing.

An interesting thought on these tonality studies – all of the commentary below applies to each of the tonalities, but what you will find is in each of the tonalities, each of the exercises will present different challenges due to range, fingerings, intonation, aperture, tongue levels, etc.

#1 – Believe or not, this is an interval study. Yes, the interval you on working on is the chromatic 1/2 step. Strive to have each and every note resonate clearly. Blow through the valves and out into the room. Get your tone to match on each note. Take your time, don’t rush. Think of this as a long tone study and move the air through the whole exercise. When tonguing, connect each note to the next, leave no space between the notes. Full value notes, not staccato. It’s all one long tone, your tongue is just articulating the beginning of each pitch.

#2 – Play with a full sound, not loud, just full. Once again this is all one long tone. Be sure you are not sliding between notes to get to the next note, it’s either one note or the other. Minimize the movement of your face and jaw as much as possible, use the beginning note as the homebase for your embouchure as you move through this exercise.

#3 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#4 – Practicing these slowly is good, focus on getting your slide to move quickly and smoothly at the correct time. You may wish to repeat each two bar phrase. Make sure to keep the air moving past the values and resonate the room with each note. Match the tone quality on each note.

#5, 6, 7 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#8 – When first learning the two octave chromatic scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave chromatic scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out.

#9 – Play with a full singing style sound. Make this study as musically beautiful as you possibly can. Resonate the room with a full and relaxed sound.

#10 – Each note needs to speak clearly. Don’t make them too short, each note should resonate. Be sure to play this one three times, and get it to sound great the first time through it.

#11 – Once again, think of this as one long tone, it’s one stream of air, but the pitch changes each beat. No separation between notes, no sliding between notes. Listen closely to your intonation, know ahead of time the pitch center of the note you are about to play, then play that note right in it’s most resonant center. Use all indicated articulations so you learn to come into the notes from every which way.

#12 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the double tongue articulation. It’s okay to slow down the double tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the T-K that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#13 – Each note should flow into the next one. You may want to also practice this all slurred so that you get the feeling of it all being one long tone, then go back and add the slur-two tongue-two articulation. Make this sound effortless.

#14/15 – Play full value sixteenth notes, don’t try to play them short, they’re already short. Connect each note to the next, with the tongue only activating to define the beginning of the notes. Use all indicated articulations.

#16/17 – Practice this slowly and memorize it. Get the feel for the free air flow up and down the arpeggio. Make it sound easy and effortless. Stay relaxed as you ascend and descend. Use all indicated articulations.

#18 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the triple tongue articulations. It’s okay to slow down the triple tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the TTK and TKT that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#19 – Playing these slowly is just fine. You are after accuracy and tone quality. You can learn these by playing two beats at a time ending on the next downbeat, then start on that note and do the same, two beats and end on the next downbeat. Then go back and put it all together. Use all indicated articulations.

#20 – Just as in the two octave chromatic study, when first learning the two octave whole tone scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave whole tone scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out. The whole tone scale will force you to hear the center of the next pitch so you can resonate the tone as soon as you play it.

#21 – Learn these augmented arpeggios one measure at a time, play a measure and end on the next downbeat. Start on the second measure and end on the next downbeat, and so on. Get the sound of these augmented chords in your head so you know where you are going with the pitch of each note so it resonates the room when you play each one. Once you have this, string the whole study together as one. Use all indicated articulations. Keep that air moving, it’s all one long tone. And resonate the room with every note.

#22 – Take your time, play it slowly. Rest between each section. Go for a full and beautiful singing sound, each note is clear and resonates the room. Match the tone quality of one note to the next, each note connects without break to the next. Use all indicated articulations.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trombone Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trombone

 

 

 

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The Advancing Trombone Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

June 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trombone Player 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Warmup Routine Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Warmup Routine, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

When you first start using the book, in the first session (the Warmup Routine), just play exercises 1-4 and 17 the first week. Then the second week add one more exercise (ie 1-5 and 17), then the third week add one more exercise (ie 1-6 and 17) and continue in this pattern until you are playing exercises 1-17 of the Warmup Routine daily. If at any time the additional added exercise is not to your liking (still difficult) at the end of the practice week, then stay with that routine for another week or so until you it becomes easier for you.

#1 – The breath attack on the first note F of each set is to let your lips know that when you release the air stream you really want your lips to vibrate and instantly create your sound. Be sure to have your air pressure in place before starting the sound, the sound should start instantly. Exhale, inhale, release, resonate the room with your sound.

Match the tone color of the fingered notes to the open F sound. As you move your way down and up the scale, match the tone quality of each note to the others. Because you are using different valve combinations the tone quality will change, it’s up to you to make minor adjustments to get the tone quality to match note for note. Make sure to not slide the pitch from one to another, the pitch of each note should happen instantly. Keep the air moving through the valve changes. Always fill the room with your sound. Resonate the room.

Take the horn off your lips after each fermata. Rest as long as you just played. Note that each line of this exercise gets longer in length, learn to regulate your air flow, in and out. After you’re done, rest at least two minutes, more is good.

#2 – Now we add the tongue attack (T) on the notes. Get those first two eighth notes to resonate the room, they should not be staccato, just a full eighth note. By resonate the room, I don’t mean loud, rather get the feeling that you are filling the room with your sound to all the corners of the room and you can hear it coming back to you. This is not echo. It is you exciting the air in the room with your playing. Always, no matter what you are playing, resonate the room.

In measure two, three and four, connect the notes, do not slide between the notes. The note pitches are one or another, little notches of tone. Keep the air moving, think of everything as one long tone. Rest as marked.

#3 – Match the tone quality of each note, the lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the lower neighbor tone, the slur up, the upper neighbor tone, the slur down, the upper neighbor tone, and the slur down and hold. Keep the air moving, it’s all one long tone, just the pitches you play are different. Resonate the room.

#4 – Going from note 1 to note 2, it’s either the B or the G#, there is no E in the middle (same on the other slide combinations on the first two notes). Then keep the air moving and slur down and up without sliding from note to note. Listen to yourself closely, each note has it’s pitch and tone quality, match them and smooth out any glitches. All one long tone, resonate the room.

#5 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#6 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed. When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#7 – It’s all one long tone, you are just changing pitches along the way. Match the tone quality pitch to pitch, especially the top note of the sets, keep the air moving all the way up and back down. No sliding, each note counts, each note resonates the room.

#8 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed. When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#9/10 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#11 – Get the tempo of the sixteenth notes in your mind before you begin. Play the first two notes with a resonate sound even though they are eighth notes. Play the slurred sixteenth notes evenly and smoothly, no sliding allowed. When you land on the half note it should be stable and steady with a resonate sound holding it full value and then slur down without sliding to the next note and then slur down without sliding to the next note and hold, then rest.

#12 – Go for a full singing sound as you play this one. Keep the open, relaxed feeling of the low notes as you ascend to the higher notes. Keep your concentration up after the top note and descend gracefully all the way down and hold. No sliding between notes.

#13 – Wow, look at all of those Cb notes. That 7th position is the longest your trombone gets, and it takes a little more concentration to get your horn to speak compared to other notes, and it’s up to you to make this happen. This study helps you learn how to match the tone quality going from longest to all the other slide positions too, plus make it happen over a few different overtone partials. Be sure to do all of the articulations, this assures you are approaching this issue from every which way to get your chops working efficiently. And remember, it’s all one long tone. Oh, and… resonate the room.

#14/15 – Full length sixteenth notes, don’t try to play staccato, they are already short notes. Resonate each one, every note counts, no fluffs accepted. Match the tone quality each note to the others, listen closely to the intonation of each note so you are playing the middle of the pitch when you attack the note. Keep reminding yourself that it’s all one long tone, the air keeps moving all the way from the first note through the last note.

#16 – Once again, it’s all one long tone. Keep the air moving in a steady flow from first note through the last note. There should only be the notes heard that are written, no little extra notes when you slur up between notes 3 and 4. It’s okay to practice this slowly to get the feeling of the air flow, and the continuous resonating of the room with your sound. Give a little special attention to the next to last note of the phrase, it’s a little “curve ball” thrown at you to get you to change your valves quickly and have the note speak clearly, still with the same tone quality as the other notes.

#17 – Go for a relaxed and resonate sound. Fill the room with your sound, not loud, just resonate.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trombone Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trrombone

 

 

 

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The Advancing Trumpet Player – here’s what David Cooper says

May 23, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerThe Advancing Trumpet Player – here’s what David Cooper says

Hi Mark,

I love your book “The Advancing Trumpet Player”.

It is quite a routine and works everything associated with trumpet playing.

The tonality studies really help to learn your scales and flexibility!!

I miss some days because of my work schedule but seem to pick up where I left off.

I do wish that there was more time for Trumpet!!!

This book is a major asset – Thanks Mark!!

David Cooper
Cataula, GA

Hey David, thanks so much for sharing your comments with everyone.

One of the biggest problems we all have in practicing is coming up with an action plan, a track to run on.

ATP is designed to be that kind of action plan.

You simply follow the lesson plans that are included, and if we get knocked off track for a little while, it’s easy to pickup where you left off and get back on the plan.

And there’s plenty of variety to keep your practice sessions interesting and challenging too.

If you have a copy already, dig in and stick with it… you will get great results.

If you don’t have your copy yet, get yours today.  It comes with my personal 100% money-back satisfaction guarantee.

Get it here:  http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Wayne Johnson comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

April 30, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerWayne Johnson comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

I received my ATP on Saturday and it is just what I needed!

I’m a “comeback player” with about 5 years back on the horn after 19 years off. I was doing pretty good until I had to have major dental work and I had to basically start over from scratch. I needed a structured plan that covers all aspects of playing and ATP does just that!

Thank you for writing this book, it is just what the doctor ordered!!

As an added extra to the ATP is that my family prefers it over the routine I was doing before!  My wife says it sounds more musical, like I’m prepping for a concert.

Thanks again Mark!

Wayne Johnson
Bakersfield, CA

Hi Wayne,

And thank you so much for sending in your comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book.

Now that your experiencing it for yourself, you know the studies and routines in it will be ones that you’ll benefit from for many years to come to continually improve your all-around playing and keep you in shape too – you’ll be ready for anything they throw at you, no matter what kinds of playing situations you find yourself in. Glad to hear your wife likes the new you too!

And if you’ve been thinking about getting your own copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player, go ahead and order yours today. Just begin with lesson one (I’ve provided 52 lessons) and you’ll start seeing improvement in your playing, and get more enjoyment from it too, just like others do.

Here’s where to get your copy:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book from Wayne Johnson

April 30, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerComments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book from Wayne Johnson

I received my ATP on Saturday and it is just what I needed!

I’m a “comeback player” with about 5 years back on the horn after 19 years off. I was doing pretty good until I had to have major dental work and I had to basically start over from scratch. I needed a structured plan that covers all aspects of playing and ATP does just that!

Thank you for writing this book, it is just what the doctor ordered!!

As an added extra to the ATP is that my family prefers it over the routine I was doing before!  My wife says it sounds more musical, like I’m prepping for a concert.

Thanks again Mark!

Wayne Johnson
Bakersfield, CA

Hi Wayne,

And thank you so much for sending in your comments about The Advancing Trumpet Player book.

Now that your experiencing it for yourself, you know the studies and routines in it will be ones that you’ll benefit from for many years to come to continually improve your all-around playing and keep you in shape too – you’ll be ready for anything they throw at you, no matter what kinds of playing situations you find yourself in. Glad to hear your wife likes the new you too!

And if you’ve been thinking about getting your own copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player, go ahead and order yours today. Just begin with lesson one (I’ve provided 52 lessons) and you’ll start seeing improvement in your playing, and get more enjoyment from it too, just like others do.

Here’s where to get your copy:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Tom Hall says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

April 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trumpet Player 

The Advancing Trumpet PlayerTom Hall says this about The Advancing Trumpet Player book

I have been using The Advancing Trumpet Player for about 5 months. My sound, range, and endurance have all improved dramatically!

Mark’s books really do work!

Tom Hall
Retired Band Director and
Life-long trumpet player
Iowa Falls, IA

Hi Tom,

Thanks for your comments you posted on Facebook recently.

Best to you … Mark

If you haven’t gotten your copy of The Advancing Trumpet Player yet, go ahead and order it today. Be assured if you simply follow the lesson plans in the book, you will improve all aspects of your playing just like Tom did.

If you already have a copy, dig in and do the program. Some simple disciplined practice that progresses step by step is exactly what you need, and The Advancing Trumpet Player does that for you.

Order yours today, or at least get our free Trumpet Players Sample Pack … but don’t put this off, take some action now, you deserve it…

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Dave Ramsey writes about The Comeback Trumpet Player

April 13, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

The Comeback Trumpet Player

Dave Ramsey writes about The Comeback Trumpet Player

I’m Dave Ramsey in Philadelphia, PA.

I have a degree in Jazz trumpet from Temple University from 10 years ago.

I’ve been working a lot on composition for the past couple years so I’ve mostly just been doing long tones a few times a week. After starting to get ready for the performance I kept finding it difficult to practice longer than 10 minutes without taking a long break.

I picked up Comeback Trumpet Player and had a wonderful lesson with Mark. By following the structure of the book that specifically highlights a variety of exercises that strengthen all of my playing my lips feel better than they’ve ever felt and I can practice nearly all day. I’ve been using the book now for 4 weeks and continue to progress both through it and have energy to practice the jazz licks and songs I want.

Mark everything is going fantastically. My lips feel better than ever.

Thank you so much Mark!

Dave Ramsey
Philadelphia, PA

Hey Dave – that’s GREAT news!

It’s amazing how something as simple as resting during your practice sessions as I prescribe can make such a huge difference in your ability to practice more and get more accomplished in a shorter time frame… and still have your chops feel good at the end of the day and at the beginning of the next day too!

Check out all the trumpet books, each specifically targets an area of playing – however they all have efficient and effective practice concepts written into them to get you the most results in the least amount of time.

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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David Cooper – Full Range Studies for Trumpet book

April 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Full Range Studies 

Full Range Studies for TrumpetDavid Cooper on the Full Range Studies for Trumpet book

I have never met Mark Hendricks but when I saw his Full Range Studies for trumpet book, I had to give it a try.

Like most trumpet players, I have quite a collection of trumpet books, methods, sheet music etc. – I look forward to the every other day of doing the routines and it is quick and precise to the development of better trumpet playing!!!

I have been through the book on schedule and my wife even made a comment the other day that I was sounding really good!!

(I’ll take it!!)

I would recommend this book to all brass players!!

Thanks Mark!!!!

David Cooper
Cataula, GA

P.S. – When Momma’s happy, then you know it’s good…(Awesome)!!!!

Hi David,

So glad to hear your wife is noticing, that’s great… 🙂

One of the nice things about the book is you’re not playing the same thing every day, it makes it more fun to sit down and practice this stuff every other day, and it doesn’t drive your family nuts having to listen to you LOL.

Get your own copy today and get going…

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Best,

Mark Hendricks

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Bill Adam and Greg Wing Do Schlossberg

February 2, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Trumpet 

Bill AdamBill Adam and Greg Wing Do Schlossberg and Clarke

Listen closely to see how to practice Clark #1 and Schlossberg #6, 31, 13, 14, 15, 17 & 95 with his then student Greg Wing; 1980. Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

Greg has been the trumpet professor at Morehead State University for many years, see more about him and his career at Greg Wing.

Get the Schlossberg book at this link

Get the Clarke book at this link

Bill Adam and Greg Wing – on Soundcloud audio

 

All The Notes and More

January 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: All The Notes And More 

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for Trumpet

All The Notes and More

(for trumpet, saxophone, and trombone)

All The Notes and More contains 70 studies in each of the 12 tonalities to develop and maintain tone, tonguing, technique, flexibility, endurance, range, and more for all players no matter what styles you play.

In it you will practice and master all kinds of scales and arpeggios in all ranges of your instrument. They are the necessary building blocks of music, and all top performers have them ingrained into their playing so they can perform at the highest levels of musicianship.

You can get a free sample PDF at the links mentioned above and below.

It’s available for trumpet, saxophone, and trombone – click each link for more info.

All The Notes and More for SaxophoneAll The Notes and More for Trombone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As always, my best to you — Mark Hendricks

 

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Full Range Studies for Trumpet

December 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Full Range Studies, Trumpet 

Full Range Studies for TrumpetFull Range Studies for Trumpet

A complete system to develop and maintain your range, sound, endurance, and flexibility from Low F# to Double High C … and beyond! (91 pages)

The Full Range Studies for Trumpet book can be used by all trumpet players, at any level of playing. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, comeback player, or professional – this book will be very valuable to you over the years to come.

The “FRS” system consists of 18 studies. One study of the 18 should be played every other day on a rotation basis (1, 2, 3, 4…17, 18), and three times a week is recommended. You will do the complete rotation every 6 weeks. Don’t try to play all of the studies in one day, these are meant to build you up, not beat you up.

Each study session will take you approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. If you rest correctly during the practice session, your embouchure should feel good, not beat up. If you feel beat up then you didn’t rest enough or you went too far in the study. Only go as far in each study as you can without playing incorrectly. It does no good to practice incorrect habits.

Get more info and get your copy now here http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Full Range Studies for Trumpet – Quick Start Guide

December 22, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Full Range Studies, Trumpet 

Full Range Studies for TrumpetFull Range Studies for Trumpet – Quick Start Guide

Congratulations on your purchase of the Full Range Studies for Trumpet book!

Here’s a few tips on getting starting using the FRS book:

– The purpose of the book is to provide a complete system to develop and maintain your range, sound, endurance, and flexibility from Low F# to Double High C … and beyond! And it can be used by all trumpet players, at any level of playing. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, comeback player, or professional – this book will be very valuable to you over the years to come.

– The “FRS” system consists of 18 studies. One study of the 18 should be played every other day on a rotation basis (1, 2, 3, 4…17, 18), and three times a week is recommended. You will do the complete rotation every 6 weeks. Don’t try to play all of the studies in one day, these are meant to build you up, not beat you up.

– Each study session will take you approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. If you rest correctly during the practice session, your embouchure should feel good, not beat up. If you feel beat up then you didn’t rest enough or you went too far in the study. Only go as far in each study as you can without playing incorrectly. It does no good to practice incorrect habits.

– Be diligent in your practice, you will be rewarded for your discipline by following the routines in the 18 studies – using these studies in this step-by-step system will get you playing better, and much quicker, than a haphazard approach to practicing

– Rest as much as you play and rest as much as you play within each practice session, you should still feel good at the end of each practice session

– Always strive for a great sound on every note

– Always play musically – don’t just play, make music

– Slow and good is better than fast and bad – you will learn faster by practicing slowly, then speed up in small increments to improve your coordination to play faster and still sound good

– Practice all of the articulations when indicated (S=Slur, T=Tongue, B=breath, etc.)

– Use a metronome to help you improve your coordination as you speed things up

– If you can’t reach some notes, give it three tries and then move on – they will come in time

– Play with other people, whether it be duets, trios, quartets, quintets, band, orchestra, jazz ensemble, church services – get out there and rehearse, perform and make music with others

– Each study is meant to be played once and then move to the next one on the next FRS practice day of the week (every other day, three days a week is fine). These are not technically hard, so you don’t have to “practice” them with repetition, so just move on to the next study in rotation. Just keep progressing step-by-step through the lessons – and start with Study 1

– When you get to the end of the 18 studies after 6 weeks, start at Study 1 again and continue through the studies to Study 18. Then once again go back to Study 1 and do the same, again and again for development and maintenance

– As you advance in these studies, you can begin playing two phrases together without removing the mouthpiece and resting. Do the whole book this way (1-18 in rotation), then on the next time through the book do 3 phrases without removing the mouthpiece, and the next time through the book 4 times, etc. – always end your practice session feeling good so you can practice other things or perform later

For more info on the book and other trumpet books you may be interested in, visit:

http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Hey Trumpet Players – here’s a great freebie for you!

December 21, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Trumpet 

FreeHey Trumpet Players – here’s a great freebie for you!

(updated as of 12/21/15 – download again for the newest version)

It’s the Trumpet Players Sample Pack.

These are sample studies and exercises from our books for trumpet you can add to your practice routines. And if you like them, we’re guessing you’ll want to purchase the complete print books too.

Here’s how to get the Trumpet Players Sample Pack, click this link and see the top of the page:

http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

Oh, one other thing…Be sure to check out out blog for lots of videos, event
updates and more at:http://www.mphmusic.com/blog
And also LIKE our Facebook page at:http://www.facebook.com/mphmusicdotcom

You can share this message with your friends,
I know they will appreciate you thinking of them.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

One very important tip for The Comeback Trumpet Player

November 22, 2015 by · 4 Comments
Filed under: Comeback Trumpet Player, Trumpet 

The Comeback Trumpet PlayerOne very important tip for The Comeback Trumpet Player

Immediately go find some groups to play in and make music. This will keep you motivated to practice and you need to make music, not just practice to really get yourself back into shape and enjoying all aspects of playing the trumpet (music, social, challenge, concentration, etc).

Here’s a few ideas:

1 – Community Bands and Orchestras

2 – Brass Bands

3 – Church groups

4 – Jazz Ensembles

5 – College-sponsored groups

6 – Duets with other trumpet players (5 star tip)

Actually schedule a time each week to play duets. We all need to have ensembles to play and perform in, and a duet is the easiest to organize – it’s just you and your duet partner. Or add a third player to make things even more fun (plus this makes sure you are resting properly by having only two of you play while the third is resting).

Here’s a page on my site for some links to lots of performing options:

http://mphmusic.com/play/

And…

Get that book “The Comeback Trumpet Player”

And if you need a great duet book, look on my site for the 49 Long Lost Arban Duets for Trumpet (…that Arban never wrote!)

Here’s a sample letter you can email to the organizations you find in the directory:

replace “wind ensemble” with orchestra, brass band, church orchestra, etc

Subject line: I am interested in playing trumpet in your wind ensemble.

Message:

Hi,

My name is Mark Hendricks.

I am interested in playing trumpet in your wind ensemble.

Here is where you can see a little about my experience:

http://mphmusic.com/about.htm

(or just include a little about your experience here, if you don’t have a webpage)

Whether it be an extra chair upon occasion, or to fill a current opening, it’s okay with me.

Mark Hendricks
Phone: 987 654 3210  (use your real phone number 🙂 )

That’s it. They will get back to you.

Go forth and let the trumpet sound!!

Mark

 

Improv Speed Builders Volume 5 – Nuts and Bolts – by Rich Willey

November 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Jazz 

Improv Speed Builders 5Improv Speed Builders Volume 5 – Nuts and Bolts – by Rich Willey

Rich always has interesting and creative ways to tackle learning to improvise.

He’s recently released a new book called “Improv Speed Builders Volume 5 – Nuts and Bolts”, it’s a great addition to other “Improv Speed Builders” volumes and his “Jazz Improv Materials Handbook Complete” book.

It’s written for all players, no matter what the instrument or key… and comes with hours upon hours of play-a-long tracks that help you learn slowly at first, then speed things up as you progress.

He thoroughly covers 12 different types of chord progressions in all 12 keys, and provides five accompaniment tracks at slower to faster tempo.

Get more details on this release plus all the other goodies Rich offers at:

http://richwilley.com/products/improv-speed-builders-volume-5-nuts-bolts

As always, my best to you —

Mark

Slide Master for Trombone

June 10, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Trombone 

Slide Master for TromboneSLIDE MASTER for Trombone – 101 Studies For Making Your Slide Technique Work Right, And Your Tongue And Chops Too. Plus 12 Etudes and 12 Duets that Target Your Slide Technique

You know what I’m talking about, it’s the thing that really hangs you up when you’re playing scales and arpeggios, and completely messes you up when you’re really trying to impress your friends and amaze your audiences…. 🙂 – You can download a free sample page from the book, see below.

All of the studies, etudes, and duets in this book target your slide technique while playing a variety of interesting patterns, articulations, and ranges. Developing your strength, technique, and coordination will improve all of your abilities to play with more agility, musicality, and confidence.

To get a sample PDF of the first pages of the sixteenth notes and triplets exercises plus two of the etudes/duets signup for the free Trombone Player’s Sample Pack. There are 101 slide technique studies, and 12 etudes and 12 matching duets in the full printed book (69 pages).

Get free sample pages and order here:

http://www.mphmusic.com/solo-chamber-music.htm

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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10th Grader says this is his quick warm-up

Give It The 3rd Finger10th Grader says this is his quick warm-up

I just got a note from trumpet pro and long-time trumpet teacher John Baker (Tampa area) that one of his students who has been working his way through all of the “Give It The 3rd Finger” studies book uses three specific exercises as a quick warm-up when he doesn’t have time for a more thorough one.

It’s exercises 1, 3, and 30 — memorize them and play all the articulations indicated says John’s 10th grade student.

So I gave it a try and thought about all the quick benefits to doing this that he discovered: finger technique, air flow and speed, tone, flexibility, articulation, slurring, single tongue, K tongue, double and two forms of triple tonguing, and giving your brain a little workout for keeping you sharp and thinking well.

If you have the book or the free sample pack you can try out his discovery for yourself.

If you don’t have the book or free sample pack you can get yours here:

http://www.MPHmusic.com/trumpet-music.htm

And be sure to visit our blog that is at our website, it’s direct address is:

http://www.MPHmusic.com/blog

I guess I could have titled this…

“Young Dog Teaches Old Dog New Tricks”
(…even if the Old Dog wrote the book)

🙂

In joy!

Mark Hendricks
http://www.MPHmusic.com

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