Here’s what Jeff Brandt had to say

May 30, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Mark,

The books you have recently written, are ALL just fantastic! ”

“Give It The 3rd Finger” has certainly turned out to be a hit with people as I watch posts about it.

But, I have to tell you, “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book, has been extremely helpful to me!

The combination of all the things you put in there, from all the years from many different teachers, brought back to memory all those things, and IF, IF I would just do them daily as you state, I really begin to improve quickly, and gain back many of the strengths I once had, and I improve with much less stress. Your book WORKS wonders! It is a true must for trumpet players who want to improve or maintain. It’s great Mark.

Thanks for putting so much time, thought and effort into such a excellent resource for all of us ! You are a blessing, in many, many ways!

Sincerely,

Jeff Brandt
Director of Music Ministries and Solo Trumpeter
New Hope United Methodist Church
Valrico, Florida

Jeff, thanks so much for your kind words, and it makes me feel great that “The Advancing Trumpet Player” book has helped you so much.

For those trumpeters who want to chack out why Jeff was so excited to write, here’s a link to all the trumpet books….

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

And if you play trombone or sax, here’s a link for you too…

http://mphmusic.com

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Comments from Owen Klug about the Advancing Trombone Player

October 11, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowComments from Owen Klug about the Advancing Trombone Player

Hi Mark,

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP. Thanks again, Owen Klug

Here’s a few comments that I have that may help others…

I had stopped playing for about 45+/- years. I gave everything away except the horn.

After retiring, I needed something to do and my horn was the answer. I played in several bands – from concert, swing, rock…etc. I was also in the ARMY Show Band.

I practiced and reached a level of proficiency that got me into 3 concert bands and 3 big swing/dance bands. then I seemed to plateau-out (did not get any better).

I think I heard about you and your method books through the internet… not sure.

The thing I’m finding the most effective about the Advancing Trombone Player book and system
is the exercises and the amount of exercises in each lesson. And the practice time required.

The thing I’m liking and impressed with the most is how quick I started improving again after leaving that initial plateau I was on.

The difference is your approach, I think.  The amount of exercises and the various types of challenging exercises you provide.  This differs from other lesson types. In addition, your lesson plans require more practice time and are more demanding. This is definitely a Good Thing.

The most obvious result I’ve noticed so far is my capabilities mature much faster and that helps and enhances my confidence level. I don’t feel so challenged when playing in bands.

I’m happy to tell you I’ve already recommended the Advancing Trombone Player to others, telling them how much my confidence level has increased since I started using the ATP.

One other thing, a little insight about Mark — he is very supportive and goes out of his way to help you improve and achieve your goals.

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP.

Thanks again, Owen Klug

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

Hi Owen, Mark here…

Thanks for sharing your comments and enthusiasm in your success using the Advancing Trombone Player method book system. I can tell you are putting in the disciplined practice time and follow the lesson plans, that the quickest way to get the most results in the least amount of time.  And as time goes by, as you progress through all of the lessons, things will continue you improve at an even quicker rate.

Congratulations, and thanks again for sharing your thoughts.

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

The Advancing Trombone Player – Owen Klug says this

October 11, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trombone Player 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Owen Klug says this

Hi Mark,

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP. Thanks again, Owen Klug

Here’s a few comments that I have that may help others…

I had stopped playing for about 45+/- years. I gave everything away except the horn.

After retiring, I needed something to do and my horn was the answer. I played in several bands – from concert, swing, rock…etc. I was also in the ARMY Show Band.

I practiced and reached a level of proficiency that got me into 3 concert bands and 3 big swing/dance bands. then I seemed to plateau-out (did not get any better).

I think I heard about you and your method books through the internet… not sure.

The thing I’m finding the most effective about the Advancing Trombone Player book and system
is the exercises and the amount of exercises in each lesson. And the practice time required.

The thing I’m liking and impressed with the most is how quick I started improving again after leaving that initial plateau I was on.

The difference is your approach, I think.  The amount of exercises and the various types of challenging exercises you provide.  This differs from other lesson types. In addition, your lesson plans require more practice time and are more demanding. This is definitely a Good Thing.

The most obvious result I’ve noticed so far is my capabilities mature much faster and that helps and enhances my confidence level. I don’t feel so challenged when playing in bands.

I’m happy to tell you I’ve already recommended the Advancing Trombone Player to others, telling them how much my confidence level has increased since I started using the ATP.

One other thing, a little insight about Mark — he is very supportive and goes out of his way to help you improve and achieve your goals.

I am so glad to have connected with you and The Advancing Trombone Player, I really have an increased confidence level because of ATP.

Thanks again, Owen Klug

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

Hi Owen, Mark here…

Thanks for sharing your comments and enthusiasm in your success using the Advancing Trombone Player method book system. I can tell you are putting in the disciplined practice time and follow the lesson plans, that’s the quickest way to get the most results in the least amount of time.  And as time goes by, as you progress through all of the lessons, things will continue you improve at an even quicker rate.

Congratulations, and thanks again for sharing your thoughts.

Get your copy of the Advancing Trombone Player – click here.

The Advancing Trombone Player

June 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trombone Player 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player

Get your copy of this trombone study book today…

It’s a complete step-by-step system that includes everything you need to build your embouchure, tone, technique, flexibility, tonguing, endurance, range, and musicianship. Written for those trombone players who are ready to achieve the highest levels of playing their horn.

The “ATP” system consists of four sessions per day: warm-up, tonality study, Arban’s book studies, and endurance/range/musicianship studies. This will take approximately two hours per day divided into four sessions, with breaks in between. Don’t try to play all of the assignments in one session, you really do need the rest to keep your embouchure fresh all day and ready again for the next day.

If you cannot commit to two hours per day, then go with one hour per day and play every other exercise in the lessons on day one, then on day two play the ones you skipped, on day three alternate back to the ones you played on day one, and so on back and forth throughout the week. And spend two weeks on each lesson instead of one week, or longer if needed, when using this pattern.

The Advancing Trombone Player has additional emphasis on multiple tongue articulations in the tonality studies that builds more strength, endurance, and agility all over the horn. The ATP is really designed for those who really want to step up their game and master all registers of the trombone.

Get more info, sample pages, and order your copy of The Advancing Trombone Player now at:

http://www.MPHmusic.com/trombone

Best,

Mark

The Advancing Trombone Player – Tips #1

June 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trombone Player 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Tips #1

I received this note from one of our customers, and I thought others may benefit from my answers too…

I have been making some progress through the lessons but my practice time has been somewhat restricted lately. I am concerned that I will spend one session warming up and then have little to no time for further lesson progression or just practicing music. Is there an expedited warm up regimen I can use. I have seen 20 minute plans and others.

Second what should I use as a metric or success before I move on through the parts of each lesson? No mistakes/perfect tempo, 1,2,3 mistakes? My concern with some of the Arban’s and even your practice lines is I might never play it perfectly. Or do you just play the lines once through ignoring mistakes and work to correct them the second time around?

Hope these questions make sense.
Any advice is appreciated.

Thanks, L.

And my note back to him…

Hi L.,

Try this for the warmup routine.

Do all of 1-5. This is basically a warmup. Get the lips vibrating, get the air moving, sound clearing, embouchure responding to tongue and slur, and some flexibility too.

Then for the other exercises (which are a daily routine to cover more areas of playing), do lines 1,3,5,7 one day, then line 1,2,4,6 the next. This assures you are covering all of each at least a few times during the week, and shortening the time.

As far as progressing through lessons week by week….

It is really at your own pace, and how picky and tough you want to be on yourself.

I’d rather have you play things slower, with a great sound on every note, and not necessarily the whole exercise meaning you can divide it up into doing a line at a time, etc – and piece it all together over time).

For the tonality studies (section 2), this works fine, because after the first 3 months you will be doing one tonality a day as improvement and review … and your sound, playing, and technique will be improving continuously.

For section 3 (Arbans) – same things, slower with great sound and accuracy is better than fast and bad. This approach yields the best results in the shortest period of time.

A lot of what we do when we practice is build the automatic response systems required to play, and we really must slow things down to do it – kind of like a kid learning to ride a bike – lots of wobbling and falling at first, but once the balance and memory response is developed, away they go.

And just as they learn to keep their balance, and pedal and ride faster, so will you in speeding up the exercises that need to be speeded up … but always, even at quicker speeds your sound must clearly resonate the room. Each and every note.

You can read more about how to use the book at this link: Advancing Trombone Player

To get the book and see more, click The Advancing Trombone Player book

Best,
Mark Hendricks

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The Advancing Trombone Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

June 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trombone Player 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Tonality Studies Commentary

Here’s some tips on each of the exercises in the Tonality Studies, kind of the what, why, and how to practice each.

The most important rule – it’s better to play slow and correct, than fast and bad. If you practice playing incorrectly, you will only reinforce incorrect playing.

An interesting thought on these tonality studies – all of the commentary below applies to each of the tonalities, but what you will find is in each of the tonalities, each of the exercises will present different challenges due to range, fingerings, intonation, aperture, tongue levels, etc.

#1 – Believe or not, this is an interval study. Yes, the interval you on working on is the chromatic 1/2 step. Strive to have each and every note resonate clearly. Blow through the valves and out into the room. Get your tone to match on each note. Take your time, don’t rush. Think of this as a long tone study and move the air through the whole exercise. When tonguing, connect each note to the next, leave no space between the notes. Full value notes, not staccato. It’s all one long tone, your tongue is just articulating the beginning of each pitch.

#2 – Play with a full sound, not loud, just full. Once again this is all one long tone. Be sure you are not sliding between notes to get to the next note, it’s either one note or the other. Minimize the movement of your face and jaw as much as possible, use the beginning note as the homebase for your embouchure as you move through this exercise.

#3 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#4 – Practicing these slowly is good, focus on getting your slide to move quickly and smoothly at the correct time. You may wish to repeat each two bar phrase. Make sure to keep the air moving past the values and resonate the room with each note. Match the tone quality on each note.

#5, 6, 7 – When first learning the scales, it’s okay to play one measure and the downbeat of the next. Then play the 2nd measure and the downbeat of the next, and so on. Once you have that, then you can string all of the measures together as written. Keep the air moving, don’t stop the air at the valves, resonate the room with your tone. End the first half of the exercise with a full tone note, let it really sing. Practice using all articulations, never staccato. Connect each note to the next, keep the air moving, your tongue is only there to start the next note, there should be no separation. As soon as possible, commit all scales to memory, close your eyes and play the scales. Get to the point where you see the key signature, the starting and ending notes, and just play.

#8 – When first learning the two octave chromatic scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave chromatic scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out.

#9 – Play with a full singing style sound. Make this study as musically beautiful as you possibly can. Resonate the room with a full and relaxed sound.

#10 – Each note needs to speak clearly. Don’t make them too short, each note should resonate. Be sure to play this one three times, and get it to sound great the first time through it.

#11 – Once again, think of this as one long tone, it’s one stream of air, but the pitch changes each beat. No separation between notes, no sliding between notes. Listen closely to your intonation, know ahead of time the pitch center of the note you are about to play, then play that note right in it’s most resonant center. Use all indicated articulations so you learn to come into the notes from every which way.

#12 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the double tongue articulation. It’s okay to slow down the double tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the T-K that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#13 – Each note should flow into the next one. You may want to also practice this all slurred so that you get the feeling of it all being one long tone, then go back and add the slur-two tongue-two articulation. Make this sound effortless.

#14/15 – Play full value sixteenth notes, don’t try to play them short, they’re already short. Connect each note to the next, with the tongue only activating to define the beginning of the notes. Use all indicated articulations.

#16/17 – Practice this slowly and memorize it. Get the feel for the free air flow up and down the arpeggio. Make it sound easy and effortless. Stay relaxed as you ascend and descend. Use all indicated articulations.

#18 – When you first learn this one, practice it single tongue to develop the tongue and finger coordination. Then play with the triple tongue articulations. It’s okay to slow down the triple tongue to make sure your T and K tone quality matches. You must keep the air moving through the TTK and TKT that is going on, don’t back off the air flow on the K syllable. Each note should resonate and speak clearly.

#19 – Playing these slowly is just fine. You are after accuracy and tone quality. You can learn these by playing two beats at a time ending on the next downbeat, then start on that note and do the same, two beats and end on the next downbeat. Then go back and put it all together. Use all indicated articulations.

#20 – Just as in the two octave chromatic study, when first learning the two octave whole tone scale, you may want to play the lower octave up and back down. Then play the upper octave up and back down. Use all articulations indicated. Then once you have that, put it all together as a two octave whole tone scale. Keep the air moving, stay relaxed as you ascend, there is no need to tighten up, just let the notes come out. The whole tone scale will force you to hear the center of the next pitch so you can resonate the tone as soon as you play it.

#21 – Learn these augmented arpeggios one measure at a time, play a measure and end on the next downbeat. Start on the second measure and end on the next downbeat, and so on. Get the sound of these augmented chords in your head so you know where you are going with the pitch of each note so it resonates the room when you play each one. Once you have this, string the whole study together as one. Use all indicated articulations. Keep that air moving, it’s all one long tone. And resonate the room with every note.

#22 – Take your time, play it slowly. Rest between each section. Go for a full and beautiful singing sound, each note is clear and resonates the room. Match the tone quality of one note to the next, each note connects without break to the next. Use all indicated articulations.

If you don’t have a copy of The Advancing Trombone Player book, get full details here:

http://mphmusic.com/trombone

 

 

 

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The Advancing Trombone Player – Quick Start Guide

June 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advancing Trombone Player 

Advancing Trombone Player-cover-shadowThe Advancing Trombone Player – Quick Start Guide

First of all…

Congratulations on your purchase of The Advancing Trombone Player book!

You’re embarking on a great journey complete with challenges and rewards… frustrations and fun too!

Here’s a few tips on getting starting using the ATP book:

1. Read the written materials in the front of the book during your rest time within your practice sessions, let the information there really sink in (read it many, many times).

2. When you first start using the ATP book, in the first session (the Warmup Routine), just play exercises 1-4 and 17 the first week. Then the second week add one more exercise (ie 1-5 and 17), then the third week add one more exercise (ie 1-6 and 17) and continue in this pattern until you are playing exercises 1-17 of the Warmup Routine daily. If at any time the additional added exercise is not to your liking (still difficult) at the end of the practice week, then stay with that routine for another week or so until you it becomes easier for you.

3. Always rest as much as you play DURING your practice sessions, not just between your practice sessions. You should still feel fresh at the end of the practice sessions, if not then rest more during the session. You don’t get better by playing incorrectly on beat up chops. Always strive to practice correctly. When you perform or rehearse with others, just play (your correct practice habits will be with you).

4. It’s really okay to play the tonality studies S-L-O-W-L-Y. Go for air flow (think of each exercise as one continuous long tone of air), resonant sound on every note (fill the room with your sound, no matter the length of the note), clean attack and articulations, etc. What you are wanting to do with slow practice is to give your body a chance to learn to coordinate all of the “moving parts” of trombone playing so that it becomes second nature (subconscious reflexes) and carries forward into the study when you incrementally speed it up to quicker tempo.

5. Practice all of the articulations notated (ie S, T, K, TK, TTK, TKT, Breath). This will get your embouchure learning to play each note in every which way and whatever direction.

6. When playing from the tonalities section, or the Arban’s studies section, or any other thing you practice… it’s okay to practice one measure at a time, or even two beats at a time, or whatever. You can always string things back together and play longer stretches of music as you get better. It’s more important to play correctly for short periods, than incorrectly for long periods of time.

7. In the fourth session of the lessons, play as musically as you can. Those short little songs in the Arban book are full of twists and turns that really can give your chops a good workout and get you playing with finesse, and if you do them as I prescribe, your chops will feel fresh at the end of that session. Follow the instructions in the fourth session on how to alternate in the full range studies a few days a week also.

8. Always strive to play with the best tone possible. That’s what people hear, so why not be aware of it all the time when you practice. If you really sound great, chances are you are playing correctly. Always be thinking to resonate the room, not just the horn. This is not loudness volume, this is resonance. You will hear the room “feed back” the sound to your ears when you get it right. This is not echo. It is more of a thickness of your sound in the air that resonates while you play.

9. Always strive to make your practicing sound musical – make music, that’s the ultimate end game, so do it all along the way too.

10. Consider taking some lessons, either locally with a good instructor, or with me via Skype (yes, it really does work well, and I am very, very good at coaching you along your ATP trail).

11. Contact some local ensembles and get going on playing with others (see this page for ideas).

12. Have fun and enjoy the ride!

You’ll find some other ATP tips here.

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Jeff Thomas talks about Mark’s trombone books

May 13, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Jeff Thomas talks about Mark’s trombone books

Jeff Thomas

I make my living playing my horns in various setting and in multiple genres including orchestra, operatic, ballet, Broadway shows, commercial, jazz, recording studio and chamber music. The type of playing I do requires me to be in the best, most flexible and adaptive condition possible at all times.

I have known Mark Hendricks for almost 30 years, first as a player and also as a recording engineer/producer and now as an author. He has always had a meticulous approach to his playing and musicianship and this is well reflected in his writing in these books.

All The Notes and More for Trombone
Full Range Studies for Trombone
Slide Master for Trombone
Forty-Nine Arbban Duets For Trombone

My other use for these books is with a student who is really trying to get their chops up to a professional level. I use them with students who are really trying to make it to a good school

and take it to the next level. I find the book of duets so useful for exposing them to the techniques and facility needed to play in a pro context. These serve very me well in that and they are also fun for me at the same time.

These are must have books for anybody looking to keep their chops up and to share with students with the same goals.

Jeff Thomas
– professional trombonist
Orlando Philharmonic
– principle trombone
Sarasota Orchestra
– former principle trombone

Thanks Jeff for sharing your thoughts with others, it really does help to hear from a professional like you with your years of experience playing in so many different styles, and your teaching experience with students too.

If you’d like to take a look at the books and other goodies for trombone, and even get some free samples visit this page:

http://mphmusic.com/trombone
If you’re a trumpet player or sax/reed player, visit these pages:

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

http://mphmusic.com/saxophone

To read comment from other people abour our products and services visit:

http://mphmusic.com/blog/category/comments

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Full Range Studies for Trombone

May 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Full Range Studies, Trombone 

Full Range Studies for TromboneFull Range Studies for Trombone

A complete system to develop and maintain your range, sound, endurance, and flexibility from Low E to Double High Bb … and beyond! (90 pages)

The Full Range Studies for Trombone book can be used by all trombone players, at any level of playing. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, comeback player, or professional – this book will be very valuable to you over the years to come.

The “FRS” system consists of 18 studies. One study of the 18 should be played every other day on a rotation basis (1, 2, 3, 4…17, 18), and three times a week is recommended. You will do the complete rotation every 6 weeks. Don’t try to play all of the studies in one day, these are meant to build you up, not beat you up.

Each study session will take you approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. If you rest correctly during the practice session, your embouchure should feel good, not beat up. If you feel beat up then you didn’t rest enough or you went too far in the study. Only go as far in each study as you can without playing incorrectly. It does no good to practice incorrect habits. If you want to work on your pedal register, simply extend the exercises down into the lower octaves.

Get more info, samples, and get your copy now here http://mphmusic.com/trombone

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Full Range Studies for Trombone – Quick Start Guide

May 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Full Range Studies 

Full Range Studies for TromboneFull Range Studies for Trombone – Quick Start Guide

Congratulations on your purchase of the Full Range Studies for Trombone book!

Here’s a few tips on getting starting using the FRS book:

– The purpose of the book is to provide a complete system to develop and maintain your range, sound, endurance, and flexibility from Low E to Double High Bb … and beyond! And it can be used by all trombone players, at any level of playing. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, comeback player, or professional – this book will be very valuable to you over the years to come.

– The “FRS” system consists of 18 studies. One study of the 18 should be played every other day on a rotation basis (1, 2, 3, 4…17, 18), and three times a week is recommended. You will do the complete rotation every 6 weeks. Don’t try to play all of the studies in one day, these are meant to build you up, not beat you up.

– Each study session will take you approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. If you rest correctly during the practice session, your embouchure should feel good, not beat up. If you feel beat up then you didn’t rest enough or you went too far in the study. Only go as far in each study as you can without playing incorrectly. It does no good to practice incorrect habits.

– If you want to work on your pedal register, simply extend the exercises down into the lower octaves.

– Be diligent in your practice, you will be rewarded for your discipline by following the routines in the 18 studies – using these studies in this step-by-step system will get you playing better, and much quicker, than a haphazard approach to practicing

– Rest as much as you play and rest as much as you play within each practice session, you should still feel good at the end of each practice session

– Always strive for a great sound on every note

– Always play musically – don’t just play, make music

– Slow and good is better than fast and bad – you will learn faster by practicing slowly, then speed up in small increments to improve your coordination to play faster and still sound good

– Practice all of the articulations when indicated (S=Slur, T=Tongue, B=breath, etc.)

– Use a metronome to help you improve your coordination as you speed things up

– If you can’t reach some notes, give it three tries and then move on – they will come in time

– Play with other people, whether it be duets, trios, quartets, quintets, band, orchestra, jazz ensemble, church services – get out there and rehearse, perform and make music with others

– Each study is meant to be played once and then move to the next one on the next FRS practice day of the week (every other day, three days a week is fine). These are not technically hard, so you don’t have to “practice” them with repetition, so just move on to the next study in rotation. Just keep progressing step-by-step through the lessons – and start with Study 1

– When you get to the end of the 18 studies after 6 weeks, start at Study 1 again and continue through the studies to Study 18. Then once again go back to Study 1 and do the same, again and again for development and maintenance

– As you advance in these studies, you can begin playing two phrases together without removing the mouthpiece and resting. Do the whole book this way (1-18 in rotation), then on the next time through the book do 3 phrases without removing the mouthpiece, and the next time through the book 4 times, etc. – always end your practice session feeling good so you can practice other things or perform later

For more info on the book and other trombone books you may be interested in, visit:

http://www.mphmusic.com/trombone

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

Merrill Perret comments about the 49 Long-Lost Arban Duets

May 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: 49 Long Lost Arban Duets 

FORTY-NINE LONG LOST ARBAN DUETS FOR TRUMPET (...that Arban never wrote!)Merrill Perret comments about the 49 Long-Lost Arban Duets

I’m an amateur musician. I retired five years ago, after 35 years in aviation, and finally have control over my own schedule again. I’m primarily a trumpet player, but decided to take up the trombone a year and a half ago, both as a mental challenge and to fill in a hole in our local concert band.

I don’t know Mark personally, but became aware of him through Facebook and the internet. As a newcomer to the bass clef, I was pleased to find a book of duets that caters to a wide range of abilities while providing the technical basics we all know from Arbans.

Forty-Nine Arbban Duets For TromboneWhat appealed to me the most, though, was the ability to play these duets with any combination of two bass clef or treble Bb instruments. This versatility and convenience is a great feature.

Thanks, Mark.

Merrill Perret
Huntsville, Ontario

And thank you Merrill.

The original studies written by J.B. Arban that are the basis for these forty-nine duets are among the most assigned, practiced, played, and reviewed by all trumpet and trombone players – beginner, intermediate, advanced, and pro alike. But there were never duets based on them… until now! Practicing and playing them with your friends, students, and colleagues will yield tremendous benefits for all involved. You can download some free sample duets from the book, see the link below.

These new duets are based on the studies starting with the Syncopation Studies 1-38 then the Tonguing As Applied To The Trumpet studies 135-145 that are right after all the double tongue studies. The book contains both parts. There is a separate duet book of the same duets for trombone or other bass clef instruments… so if your trombone pals have their edition it’s easy to play the classic studies as duets with them too (or treble clef euphoniums too).

Get all the details on these “49 long-lost duets” at these links:

Trumpet – http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Trombone – http://mphmusic.com/trombone

Get your copy today!

Mark Hendricks

 

 

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Merrill Perret likes the 49 Long-Lost Arban Duets

May 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

FORTY-NINE LONG LOST ARBAN DUETS FOR TRUMPET (...that Arban never wrote!)Merrill Perret likes the 49 Long-Lost Arban Duets

I’m an amateur musician. I retired five years ago, after 35 years in aviation, and finally have control over my own schedule again.  I’m primarily a trumpet player, but decided to take up the trombone a year and a half ago, both as a mental challenge and to fill in a hole in our local concert band.

I don’t know Mark personally, but became aware of him through Facebook and the internet. As a newcomer to the bass clef, I was pleased to find a book of duets that caters to a wide range of abilities while providing the technical basics we all know from Arbans.

Forty-Nine Arbban Duets For TromboneWhat appealed to me the most, though, was the ability to play these duets with any combination of two bass clef or treble Bb instruments. This versatility and convenience is a great feature.

Thanks, Mark.

Merrill Perret
Huntsville, Ontario

And thank you Merrill.

The original studies written by J.B. Arban that are the basis for these forty-nine duets are among the most assigned, practiced, played, and reviewed by all trumpet and trombone players – beginner, intermediate, advanced, and pro alike. But there were never duets based on them… until now! Practicing and playing them with your friends, students, and colleagues will yield tremendous benefits for all involved. You can download some free sample duets from the book, see the link below.

These new duets are based on the studies starting with the Syncopation Studies 1-38 then the Tonguing As Applied To The Trumpet studies 135-145 that are right after all the double tongue studies. The book contains both parts. There is a separate duet book of the same duets for trombone or other bass clef instruments… so if your trombone pals have their edition it’s easy to play the classic studies as duets with them too (or treble clef euphoniums too).

Get all the details on these “49 long-lost duets” at these links:

Trumpet – http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Trombone – http://mphmusic.com/trombone

Get your copy today!

Mark Hendricks

 

 

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Charlie Sweet comments on All The Notes and More

April 13, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for TrumpetCharlie Sweet comments on All The Notes and More

Mark,

I have The Advancing Trumpet Player, Give It The 3rd Finger, and All The Notes and More.

I believe the All The Notes and More book is by far the best book for me.

It has all the pertinent, practical scales. and the exercises in all tonalities. I especially like the blues scales as I am playing in two jazz bands. It is also helping me get my range back.  I am a returning trumpet player (five years ago) and trying to get started in the right direction, this book is definitely working for me.

I highly recommend this book.

Charlie Sweet
Grand Junction, CO

Hi Charlie,

Thanks for sharing your comments with everybody, and thanks for purchasing the three books, and I’m delighted you are finding them all valuable to you.

Each book I publish typically targets a specific area of playing, however they are all written to create an efficient and effective way to practice so you get more accomplished in less time.  I think that’s what most people find when they really follow the practice plans in each book, and stick with the systematized approach.

If you’re reading this and haven’t gotten your copies of my study books for trumpet, trombone, or sax – check out these pages…

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

http://mphmusic.com/trombone

http://mphmusic.com/saxophone

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Charlie Sweet likes All The Notes and More

April 13, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: All The Notes And More 

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for TrumpetCharlie Sweet likes All The Notes and More

Mark,

I have The Advancing Trumpet Player, Give It The 3rd Finger, and All The Notes and More.

I believe the All The Notes and More book is by far the best book for me.

It has all the pertinent, practical scales. and the exercises in all tonalities. I especially like the blues scales as I am playing in two jazz bands. It is also helping me get my range back.  I am a returning trumpet player (five years ago) and trying to get started in the right direction, this book is definitely working for me.

I highly recommend this book.

Charlie Sweet
Grand Junction, CO

Hi Charlie,

Thanks for sharing your comments with everybody, and thanks for purchasing the three books, and I’m delighted you are finding them all valuable to you.

Each book I publish typically targets a specific area of playing, however they are all written to create an efficient and effective way to practice so you get more accomplished in less time.  I think that’s what most people find when they really follow the practice plans in each book, and stick with the systematized approach.

If you’re reading this and haven’t gotten your copies of my study books for trumpet, trombone, or sax – check out these pages…

http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

http://mphmusic.com/trombone

http://mphmusic.com/saxophone

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

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Greg Alley comments on the All The Notes and More book

February 26, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Greg AlleyGreg Alley comments on the All The Notes and More book

Hi Mark,

I’m practicing right now – well, taking a much needed break!

Out of all the books, so far, I’ve been working the most from “All the Notes and More.”  It is challenging but fits directly into one of the principles I teach and aspire towards – a solid two octave range around the circle of 5ths.

As such, I play lots and lots of two octave scales and arpeggios and lips slurs every day. My lip slur book for many years has been Earl Irons. But your book increased the “vocabulary” at least tenfold!

Thank you!

Greg Alley
Hudsonville, Michigan

Trumpet instructor at Calvin College and Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Prior to teaching, Greg was a member of the West Point Band, in New York, for twenty-three years.  His music degrees are from Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Michigan and Michigan State University.  Greg plays in the Holland Symphony Orchestra, has been a soloist with the Dallas Symphony, Hudson Valley Bachfest Orchestra, and the Montclair Chamber Ensemble. And has also been a long-time member of the King’s Brass.

Greg’s website is at http://tootertutor.com

Greg has all of our books for trumpet. To see everything available and to get some free samples of each visit:

Trumpet – http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Trombone – http://mphmusic.com/trombone

Sax/Reeds – http://mphmusic.com/saxophone

See more comments from others at – http://mphmusic.com/blog/category/comments

Mark Hendricks

Merrill Perret talks about the 49 Arban Duets book

February 26, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Merrill Perret talks about the 49 Arban Duets FORTY-NINE LONG LOST ARBAN DUETS FOR TRUMPET (...that Arban never wrote!)book

I’m an amateur musician. I retired five years ago, after 35 years in aviation, and finally have control over my own schedule again.  I’m primarily a trumpet player, but decided to take up the trombone a year and a half ago, both as a mental challenge and to fill in a hole in our local concert band.

I don’t know Mark personally, but became aware of him through Facebook and the internet. As a newcomer to the bass clef, I was pleased to find a book of duets that caters to a wide range of abilities while providing the technical basics we all know from Arbans.

Forty-Nine Arbban Duets For TromboneWhat appealed to me the most, though, was the ability to play these duets with any combination of two bass clef or treble Bb instruments. This versatility and convenience is a great feature.

Thanks, Mark.

Merrill Perret
Huntsville, Ontario

Thanks Merrill for your comments and insights to using the 49 Arban Duets for Trumpet or Trombone (…that Arban Never Wrote!). See the links below on why and how these duets came about!

Here’s a link to get full details (and samples) on both versions of the book, trumpet players can play them as duets, trombone players can play them as duets, and they can be played as trumpet and trombone duets too, like Merrill does with his students.

Trumpet version (Bb treble clef) – http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

Trombone version (concert pitch bass clef) – http://mphmusic.com/trombone

See more comments from others at – http://mphmusic.com/blog/category/comments

Mark Hendricks

Peter Krom talks about Mark’s books

February 16, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Hi Mark,

I have been playing the horn for a very long time.

I like your book ” The Comeback Trumpet Player” a lot.

Why?

Because this is a book that enables you to practice in a very structured manner. It is a sort of “bible” or manual which leads you through the challenging task of getting your chops better and better (technique) as well as broadening one’s musical skills.

In summary, I love the book and I use it everyday. So it is certainly not only useful for a “comeback player”.

One tip. It would be an extra when you also could incorporate a number of exercises specifically aimed at a jazz musician (going through the scales based on a number of scores of selected songs).

Regards,

Peter Krom
The Netherlands

– – – –

Thanks Peter, and thanks for that last little tip. I will work up a blog post on how players can apply the studies in the Comeback Trumpet Player book, the Advancing Trumpet Player book, and the All The Notes and More book toward their jazz playing, great idea!

Thanks again,
Mark

To get more info on our books click the following links:

Trumpet

Trombone

Saxophone – Reeds

And you can read comments from other people too at http://mphmusic.com/blog/category/comments/

 

 

 

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Tongue Elevations in Brass Playing via MRI

February 14, 2016 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Video 

Tongue Elevations in Brass Playing via MRI

MRI  Tongue ElevationThis is a fascinating video that reveals to you how the tongue is used to create air pressure in the oral cavity to enable a brass player to play in different ranges and dynamic levels.

And how the tongue works in single and double tonguing too!

Be sure to watch all of it.

 

Here’s where you can get my Full Range Studies for Trumpet or at least some free samples: http://mphmusic.com/trumpet

(NOTE: This book could also be use by all brass players to assist in building the full range of your instrument. You may need to transpose and also do some octave dropping, etc.)

 

 

To all of our world-wide customers and readers, thank you

January 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Comments and Testimonials 

Mark HendricksTo all of our world-wide customers and readers, thank you!

Thank you to all of our customers and readers world-wide in the following countries, we appreciate you – be sure to visit our website for lots of interesting articles, videos, products, and services at http://MPHmusic.com

Albania, Andorra, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Faroe Islands, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of Serbia, Romania, Russian Federation, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States, Venezuela, Vietnam, Virgin Islands

We appreciate you so much!

Mark Hendricks
http://MPHmusic.com

All The Notes and More

January 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: All The Notes And More 

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for Trumpet

All The Notes and More

(for trumpet, saxophone, and trombone)

All The Notes and More contains 70 studies in each of the 12 tonalities to develop and maintain tone, tonguing, technique, flexibility, endurance, range, and more for all players no matter what styles you play.

In it you will practice and master all kinds of scales and arpeggios in all ranges of your instrument. They are the necessary building blocks of music, and all top performers have them ingrained into their playing so they can perform at the highest levels of musicianship.

You can get a free sample PDF at the links mentioned above and below.

It’s available for trumpet, saxophone, and trombone – click each link for more info.

All The Notes and More for SaxophoneAll The Notes and More for Trombone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As always, my best to you — Mark Hendricks

 

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All The Notes and More – Quick Start Guide

January 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: All The Notes And More 

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for TrumpetAll The Notes and More – Quick Start Guide

Congratulations on your purchase of “All The Notes and More!”

(It’s available for trumpet, saxophone, and trombone)

Here’s a few tips to help you get going:

– Always play with a great sound. No matter whether you’re playing high or low, fast or slow…always listen to yourself closely to play with a great sound. That’s what others are hearing, make them say… “Oh what a sound!” …when you play.

 

All The Notes and More for Saxophone– It is never possible to play these studies too slowly. However it is possible to play them too fast. By playing slow, you can listen closely to the fundamentals of playing to make adjustments that make playing the studies quicker much easier and more musical. As you play, be listening closely to yourself so that each note has a pleasing sound.

– Don’t just play notes – always make music!

– When learning a study, you may wish to start with the last measure, play it a few times until you are comfortable with it, then back up one measure and play the last two measures. Then practice the last three measures. Repeat this strategy until you are at the beginning of the study. This way you will have lots of practice finishing strong.

All The Notes and More for Trombone– Always use various articulations for the studies. Examples: all slurred, all tongued, slur four, slur two tongue two, tongue two slur two, multiple tonguing and on and on. Mix it up as you play through a tonality, it will help you keep your embouchure fresh and mind alert.

– When first going through the studies, you may want to spend a week, or a month, on learning a tonality. After you have learned all the tonalities, you may want to review one tonality a day split up into a few different practice sessions to maintain your level of playing.

– ALTERNATE METHOD (recommended) – start with studies #1 and #2 in the C tonality, play it. Then play #1 and #2 in the F tonality, then #1 and #2 in Bb, then #1 and #2 in Eb, and so on all the way through the 12 tonalities. When learning the studies do this for a week (or two) on each of these and you will master them in all tonalities. Then proceed to studies #3 and #4 and use the same system to learn them in all 12 tonalities. Continue through all the studies in this manner. Always vary the articulations you use throughout your practice session of these studies.

– For younger players, play to the top of your range then skip notes to pick-up the pattern and continue to the end.

– Practice slowly at first – work for even tone and rhythm, then speed up as you can play cleanly.

– Always REST as much as you play to avoid overdoing your practicing!

(It’s available for trumpet, saxophone, and trombone)

As always, my best to you —

Mark Hendricks

 

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Skype Lessons with Mark Hendricks

December 31, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Skype Lessons 

SkypeSkype Lessons with Mark Hendricks

The great thing about the internet is how it makes it possible for me to serve people all over the world.

If you have an interest in studying music with me, whether it be trumpet lessons, composing/arranging, jazz improvisation for any instrument, or general music theory… you can contact me and we will do a free 30 minute session just to see if I can help you (this can be done on Skype or the telephone).

If you find that the time we spend together has been valuable, then we can set up a scheduled time we meet by way of Skype each week.

Click this link for more details: http://mphmusic.com/skype

And you can read more about my background and experience here: http://mphmusic.com/about.htm

 

 

 

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Rafael Mendez plays Arban single tonguing studies

December 28, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Trumpet, Video 

Rafael MendezRafael Mendez plays Arban single tonguing studies

Arban’s single tonguing studies are among the most assigned, practiced, played, and reviewed by all trumpet players – beginner, intermediate, advanced, and pro alike.

In this video, one of the world’s most famous trumpeters plays the single tonguing studies 19-38 found on pages 28-36 in the Arban’s book.

You can also get some free samples of duets based on these and many more of the Arban tonguing studies in my popular book of “FORTY-NINE LONG LOST ARBAN DUETS FOR TRUMPET (…that Arban never wrote!)”, which is available at http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

They are also available for trombone and other bass clef instruments at http://www.mphmusic.com/trombone

King’s Brass Concert Tour 2015-2016

December 14, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Events 

King's BrassKing’s Brass Concert Tour 2015-2016

For over 30 years, the King’s Brass have been entertaining audiences world-wide with their uplifting musical performances.

Consisting of 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, keyboards, and percussion they take their audiences through an exciting adventure in brass and percussion playing. From the classics, to hymns, to marches, jazz, patriotic and pop, the King’s Brass concert will be something you will talk about and remember for years to come.

2015-2016 Concert Schedule (contact each local sponsor for info, tickets, seating, etc.)

http://kingsbrass.org/completeschedule.htm

Here’s a video (Hoedown by Copland)…

MEMBERS OF THE 2015-2016 KING’S BRASS TOUR

TIM ZIMMERMAN – Director of The King’s Brass, Tim received his graduate degree in Trumpet Performance from the Peabody Conservatory of Music of the Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, Maryland.  He has been a member of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra and has assisted with a number of orchestras in the Midwest and East Coast.  For thirteen years, Tim served as Chairman of the Music Department at Grace College in Winona Lake, Indiana.  He has also taught at Taylor and Indiana Wesleyan Universities in central Indiana.  Tim and his wife Beckie, have four grown children and live in the Pennsylvania mountains of Wilkes-Barre / Scranton.

GREGORY ALLEY – Currently, Gregory is the trumpet instructor at Calvin College and Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Prior to teaching, he was a member of the West Point Band in New York for twenty-three years.  His music degrees are from Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Michigan and Michigan State University.  Gregory plays in the Holland Symphony Orchestra, has been a soloist with the Dallas Symphony, Hudson Valley Bachfest Orchestra, and the Montclair Chamber Ensemble.  He, his wife Deb, and their four daughters, live in Hudsonville, Michigan.

JOHN LEIBENSPERGER – John graduated summa cum laude from both Temple University (MM) and Georgia State University (BM) with degrees in tuba performance. He has performed with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Reading Symphony, Reading POPS, and the South East Pennsylvania Symphony Orchestra.  Besides having won multiple solo and concerto competitions, John founded and directed the CMSP Youth Wind Ensemble in Philadelphia, and was the conducting assistant at Tenth Presbyterian Church.  John and his wife Lola live in New Haven, Conneticut, where he is an Artist Diploma Candidate and teaching assistant at the Yale School of Music.

DANIEL LEWIS – An active freelance musician and teacher, Daniel currently holds the third trumpet position with the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra.  He has also performed with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra in Virginia.  Daniel received his Master of Music degree in performance from the Cleveland Institute of Music and his undergraduate degree from Cedarville University in Cedarville, Ohio.  Daniel lives in Dayton, Ohio where he is an avid Ohio State Buckeye fan.

DANIEL MORRIS – Dan is a freelance bass trombonist from Northern Colorado, having done his musical studies at Mesa State College and Colorado State University. A versatile player, he has performed in a variety of settings from chamber orchestras to Broadway shows.  He is a founding member of the Cierzo Brass Quintet and principal bass trombone with the Denver Philharmonic.  Dan was recently featured as a soloist with the Philharmonic.  He also finds time to be a member of the Loveland & Mahlerfest Orchestras.  When not in a rehearsal, a performance, or driving to either, Dan enjoys biking and hiking the Colorado Rockies with his wife Emily.

RACHEL PARK – A native Korean, Rachel is pursuing Doctoral of Musical Arts at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas where she received the Master of Music / Piano Performance degree.  She served the Pilgrim Ensemble of Korea as pianist for seven years touring Thailand, China, Korea, Iraq, Kuwait as well as Carnegie Hall, NY, Crystal Cathedral, CA, and at the Korean Embassy in Washington D.C.  She was winner of the 2011 Piano Texas International Academy & Festival Concerto Competition and has soloed with Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra.  Rachel and her husband Ezra, are proud parents of their lovable three year old son, Isaac.

TIM PERRY – Tim received his Bachelor’s degree in music education from Indiana Wesleyan University.  He was a four-year member of the Blue Stars Drum and Bugle Corps playing snare drum. Tim also has a snare drum world champion title earned from the 2010 Percussive Arts Society International Convention marching snare drum competition. Tim recently completed his Master of Music degree in percussion performance at the Jacobs School of Music within Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.  Tim is an active freelance musician and has performed numerous times with the Marion Philharmonic Orchestra.

ANDREW REICH – Andrew received a Master of Music degree in Trombone Performance from the University of Georgia as well as receiving an undergraduate trombone performance degree from the University of South Carolina.  Currently living in Columbia, South Carolina, Andrew is an active free lance musician and teacher.  When not working, he enjoys everything outdoors including whitewater paddling and other thrill seeking endeavors.

JIHYE SHIM – Jihye received her Master of Music degree in trombone performance from the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. She is from South Korea, where she did her undergraduate studies at the Seoul National University. Jihye has been a member of the Gwang-Myeong Symphony Orchestra and Spirit Ensemble Brass Quintet. She is also an educator, having been a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Cincinnati, orchestra director at Baek Hyan & Han Young Middle Schools, and music coach of the Green Pasture Brass Band.  Jihye and her husband Wooram, are newly married and living in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Do you really know your scales?

December 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Music 

ALL THE NOTES AND MORE for TrumpetDo you really know your scales?

I mean major, all minors, diminished, whole tone,
blues, major and minor pentatonic, modes, chromatic,
and more!

And all of these in different patterns, arpeggios, ranges, and articulations too. And in all twelve keys.

Here’s the ultimate book for trumpet players (and any
other treble clef player)… ALL THE NOTES AND MORE!

Check it out and get free samples too at: http://www.mphmusic.com/trumpet

 

All The Notes and More for TromboneAnd there’s an edition for trombone players too…

Here’s the ultimate book for trombone players (and any
other bass clef player)… ALL THE NOTES AND MORE!

Check it out and get free samples too at: http://www.mphmusic.com/trombone

Give it a go…

Mark Hendricks

PS – tell a friend, I know they will appreciate you
thinking of them too.

PPS – be sure to  LIKE our facebook page at: http://facebook.com/mphmusicdotcom

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